Tech

March 7, 2014

Biosensors provide continuous war fighter monitoring for operational improvement

Even with rapid technological advancements in the modern warfighting environment, airmen remain the most important asset to the Air Force.

Human performance augmentation is an emerging concept based on the ability to sense and assess human health status in real-time using wearable biosensors, and enhance war fighter performance before mission safety, efficiency, and outcome is compromised.

Typical human performance monitoring is achieved by measuring physiological signatures such as heart rate, skin temperature, and blood pressure. Additionally, biological chemical/molecular information can be obtained from blood, sweat, urine, and saliva. Advances in molecular biology and biochemistry led to the discovery of small molecules, peptides, and proteins in these fluids associated with human performance.

AFRL researchers from the Materials and Manufacturing Directorate and 711th Human Performance Wing formed a multidisciplinary team to advance new technologies, mature manufacturing processes, and develop end-to-end systems to enable HPA.

Augmentation improves war fighter performance and could take a variety of forms ranging from pharmaceutical countermeasures to adaptive and autonomous systems. HPA requires new sensor devices that do not interfere with warfighter operations and can be

integrated with communication and information systems to satisfy broad mission needs.

Today’s biosensors are large and include complex supporting electronics for processing, communications, sample/fluid handling, user interfaces, and power supplies. The vision is to develop and integrate sensors into a flexible, wearable electronics platform (e.g., a flexible patch) that satisfies usability needs.

Many military systems incorporate information about the state of the equipment for mission planning/execution and asset sustainment. Including information about the state of the human provides new capability for both the operator and the military platform. For example, monitoring F-22 pilot blood oxygenation has allowed the Air Force to monitor the safety of both the pilot and the aircraft during flight.

Human Systems Integration, a parallel Air Force objective, integrates the warfighter into the surrounding weapons platform (human-machine teaming). Biosensors and HPA are enabling factors in the success of this technology.




All of this week's top headlines to your email every Friday.


 
 

 
NASA/Boeing image

NASA wraps up first green aviation tests on Boeing ecoDemonstrator

NASA/Boeing image NASA’s recent green aviation tests included the Active Flow Control Enhanced Vertical Tail Flight Experiment, for which 31 tiny devices called sweeping jet actuators were installed on the tail of a Boein...
 
 
onr-locust

LOCUST: Autonomous, swarming UAVs fly into the future

A new era in autonomy and unmanned systems for naval operations is on the horizon, as officials at the¬†Office of Naval Research announced April 14 recent technology demonstrations of swarming unmanned aerial vehicles (UAVs) ‚Ä...
 
 
NASA photograph by Ken Ulbrich

Second X-56A MUTT makes first flight

NASA photograph by Ken Ulbrich NASA researchers are using the X-56A, a low-cost, modular, remotely piloted aerial vehicle, to explore the behavior of lightweight, flexible aircraft structures. Researchers at NASA’s Armstrong ...
 

 
Air Force photograph by Rebecca Amber

Schaefer takes command of 412th Test Wing

Air Force photograph by Rebecca Amber Maj. Gen. Arnold Bunch Jr., Air Force Test Center commander (left), presents the 412th Test Wing guidon to Brig. Gen. Carl Schaefer signifying the beginning of his new command at the 412th ...
 
 

NASA creates partnership to advance composite materials for aircraft of future

NASA has established a public-private partnership with five organizations to advance knowledge about composite materials that could improve the performance of future aircraft. Composites are innovative new materials for building aircraft that can enhance strength while remaining lightweight. The agency selected the National Institute of Aerospace in Hampton, Va., to manage administration of the...
 
 

NASA awards IT contracts to 118 small, disadvantaged businesses

NASA has awarded 118 contracts to small, disadvantaged businesses under Solutions for Enterprise-Wide Procurement (SEWP V), a multi-award Government-Wide Acquisition Contract vehicle focused on information technology products and product-based services. Of these SEWP V contracts, 14 were awarded to businesses operating in historically underutilized business zones, 25 contracts were awarded to b...
 




0 Comments


Be the first to comment!


Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

You may use these HTML tags and attributes: <a href="" title=""> <abbr title=""> <acronym title=""> <b> <blockquote cite=""> <cite> <code> <del datetime=""> <em> <i> <q cite=""> <strike> <strong>