Tech

March 7, 2014

President’s budget for DARPA aims to fund promising ideas, help regain prior levels

With an eye on the urgent need to develop breakthrough technologies for national security, the President’s requested budget of $2.915 billion in fiscal year 2015 for the Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency would allow the agency to pursue promising new ideas and help to restore some of the reductions in the agency’s budget from prior years.

By making pivotal investments in new technology-driven ideas for the United States, DARPA imagines and makes possible new capabilities for overcoming the complex, multifaceted threats and challenges that lie ahead. “We are faced with huge uncertainties and shifting threats, but we also have unparalleled opportunities to advance technologies in a way that can provide the nation with dramatic new capabilities,” said DARPA Director Arati Prabhakar.

Looking back, precision guidance and navigation, stealth, unmanned aerial vehicles, night vision, and communications and networking are among the technologies that changed the face of war over the last two decades. Many people and organizations worked to make these technologies a reality. In each case, DARPA made key early investments that changed what was possible and started a revolution in capability.

Between fiscal 2009 and fiscal 2013, the DARPA’s budget declined by 20 percent in real terms, including the sequestration reduction of fsical 2013. Fiscal year 2014 appropriations restored $199 million.

The fiscal 2015 request for $136 million above the $2.779 billion appropriated in fiscal 2014 “would enable DARPA to invest more in vital areas that will improve U.S. national security by rethinking complex military systems, capitalizing on information at scale, and advancing biology as technology,” said Prabhakar. She added, “It also would allow DARPA to restore funding for its basic research portfolio so that we can continue to create new technologies in support of future capabilities.”




All of this week's top headlines to your email every Friday.


 
 

 

NASA picks top Earth data challenge ideas, opens call for climate apps

NASA has selected four ideas from the public for innovative uses of climate projections and Earth-observing satellite data. The agency also has announced a follow-on challenge with awards of $50,000 to build climate applications based on OpenNEX data on the Amazon cloud computing platform. Both challenges use the Open NASA Earth Exchange, or OpenNEX, a...
 
 
nasa-flying-lab

NASA’s flying laboratories study our world

Throughout the remainder of 2014, NASA is flying a series of airborne research campaigns from the North Pole to the South Pole and many points in between ñ to take a closer look at U.S. air quality, hurricanes in the Atlantic ...
 
 

NASA selects proposals to increase STEM education at community, technical colleges

NASA’s Office of Education will award more than $17.3 million through the National Space Grant and Fellowship Program to increase student and faculty engagement in science, technology, engineering and mathematics at community colleges and technical schools across the United States. Each award has a two-year performance period and a maximum value of $500,000. The 35...
 

 
Courtesy photograph

Space technology experiments tested in microgravity flight

Courtesy photograph University of Central Florida students and their principal investigator observe their experiment as it reacts to the microgravity environment on NASA’s C-9 reduced-gravity experiments aircraft. NASA...
 
 
NASA photograph by Tom Tschida

Seeing double: Experimental glider, rocket undergo fit checks

NASA photograph by Tom Tschida NASA intern Erik Rossi De La Fuente (upper left) admires the one-third scale, twin-fuselage sailplane concept demonstrator that will carry and launch the Whittinghill Aerospace Mini Sprite rocket....
 
 
Image courtesy of NASA/JPL/Corby Waste

NASA selects U.S. small business technology transfer projects for further development

Image courtesy of NASA/JPL/Corby Waste An artist’s rendition of the 2007 Phoenix Mars probe during landing depicts dust particles stirred up from thrusters. CFD Research Corporation, in conjunction with the University of ...
 




0 Comments


Be the first to comment!


Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

You may use these HTML tags and attributes: <a href="" title=""> <abbr title=""> <acronym title=""> <b> <blockquote cite=""> <cite> <code> <del datetime=""> <em> <i> <q cite=""> <strike> <strong>