In the news...

April 21, 2014

Headlines April 21, 2014

News:

Former Ranger breaks silence on Pat Tillman death: I may have killed him -

Almost 10 years after the friendly fire death of former NFL star turned Army Ranger Pat Tillman, a fellow ranger admits that he may have been the one who fired the fatal shot.

 

Business:

Ship study should favor existing designs -

With an eye to the international market, shipbuilders Lockheed Martin, Austal USA and Huntington Ingalls have worked to develop more heavily armed versions of ships already in production for domestic customers. Now, ironically, the proposals might have their best chance yet — as the choice to succeed the LCS as the US Navy’s next small surface combatant. 

F-35 program manager: More buyers needed to help lower production costs -

The officer who oversees the F-35, Air Force Lt. Gen. Christopher C. Bogdan, downplayed the significance of the report as a bellwether for the program. Aircraft procurement cost is up, Bogdan said, not because program expenses are out of control but because Pentagon budgets are down and the military services are buying fewer airplanes.

Hunt for airliner shows limits of satellite imagery -

The big question on the minds of industry executives and others attending the Defense Services Asia (DSA) exhibition in the Malaysian capital last week was what effect would the crash of flight MH370 have on defense spending priorities here. 

Sweden’s goals fuel Saab’s acquisitions -

The Swedish government’s drive to rebuild core national defense capacities is pivotal to Saab’s ambitions to develop a competitive submarine branch and become a major global player in this segment, government and company insiders say.

F-35 engine cost up, sustainment down -

The price tag for the Lockheed Martin F-35 joint strike fighter, the Pentagon’s most expensive weapons program, increased $7.4 billion in 2013, according to a new  Defense Department report.

Two U.S. arms programs face live-or-die reviews after costs jump -

An unmanned U.S. Navy helicopter built by Northrop Grumman and a precision ship-landing system built by Raytheon face mandatory reviews that could lead to their cancellation after quantity reductions drove unit costs sharply higher in 2013, the Pentagon announced April 17. 

Navy issues restricted UCLASS draft request for proposal -

The U.S. Navy released a long-awaited draft request for proposal (RFP) for the Unmanned Carrier Launched Airborne Surveillance and Strike (UCLASS) aircraft April 17. 

Foreign firms chase African deals with new facilities -

In just the past three months, five global defense companies have announced plans to open factories, maintenance facilities and marketing offices in four southern and east African countries. 

An-70 passes Ukraine state tests -

The Ukrainian-designed Antonov An-70 propfan tactical transport plane has passed state acceptance trials and is finally ready to enter series production, Antonov said April 11.

Thai navy may build second patrol boat under BAE license -

Thailand may build a second offshore patrol vessel under a license granted by BAE Systems and is also starting to think about exporting the ship to other navies in the region, according to a senior executive at the British-based defense contractor.

German P-3C Orion upgrade approved by U.S. State Department -

The U.S. State Department has approved a $250 million upgrade package for Germany’s eight Lockheed Martin P-3C Orion maritime patrol aircraft, the Defense Security Cooperation Agency announced April 11.

Foreign delegations invited to Eurosatory conference on helos -

The French Army Air Corps has invited some 20 foreign delegations to attend a three-day visit, with a focus on combat helicopters, at the Eurosatory trade show, an Army officer said April 17.

 

Defense:

Drones from the deep: Pentagon develops ocean-floor attack robots -

The Pentagon has come up with a new way to place paranoia in the minds of future enemies: attack drones that can patiently wait on the ocean floor for years. 

Ramping up in Europe -

The map of the U.S. military footprint in Europe is shifting as post-Cold-War-era calm seems to be ending, with new threats originating from the Middle East and Africa. In addition, the deepening crisis in Ukraine is making NATO’s newest members nervous and prompting U.S. European Command to push east to new locations; while a few long-standing bases in southern Europe are assuming new strategic importance.

Training for an uncertain military future in the California desert -

In the middle of the Mojave Desert, between Los Angeles and Las Vegas, there is a place that looks just like Afghanistan.

DOD reshapes R&D, betting on future technology -

Defense budgets had been in decline for a decade when soon-to-be-president George W. Bush laid out his vision for the U.S. military. In a 1999 speech, Bush argued that it was time for military research and development efforts to pursue big leaps, not incremental improvements.

RDT&E: New starts -

Facing declining defense budgets, the Pentagon is maintaining funding for basic research (to generate tomorrow’s tech) and late-stage testing (to finish up work on almost-ready weapons and gear). Instead, mid-stage prototyping is taking a hit. Includes a user-sortable table of the 62 new RDTE lines added for the 2015 budget. 

Study: U.S. combat aviation stuck in the industrial age -

U.S. combat air forces are ill equipped to fight a technologically empowered enemy, and it could be years or decades before the Pentagon deploys more advanced weapons. Such is the grim picture painted in a new study by the Center for Strategic and Budgetary Assessments. The authors, retired Air Force Lt. Gen. David Deptula and CSBA analyst Mark Gunzinger, make the case that aviation forces are not up to the challenges of 21st century warfare and the Pentagon has only itself to blame. 

 

Veterans:

Building a D.C. memorial for an endless war bumps into regulations -

Veterans of the war on terrorism say they deserve a monument in downtown Washington, D.C., to recognize their sacrifices, but they are hindered by a rule that says a conflict must be long finished in order to build a memorial, leading some to wonder how to commemorate a “never ending war.” 

Pentagon agrees to review burial of 22 unknown WWII sailors -

The Pentagon has agreed to conduct a review of the accounting for the bodies of 22 unknown men who died on the USS Oklahoma battleship during the World War II attack on Pearl Harbor.

 

International:

Tactical advantage: Russian military shows off impressive new gear -

Elite Russian troops are displaying a new arsenal of body armor, individual weapons, armor-piercing ammunition and collar radios – a menu of essential gear that gives them a big tactical advantage against a lesser equipped Ukrainian army.




All of this week's top headlines to your email every Friday.


 
 

 

Headlines April 24, 2015

News: More than $1 billion in U.S. emergency reconstruction aid goes missing in Afghanistan - A total of $1.3 billion that the Pentagon shipped to its force commanders in Afghanistan between 2004 and 2014 for the most critical reconstruction projects can’t be accounted for by the Defense Department, 60 percent of all such spending under an...
 
 

News Briefs April 24, 2015

German defense minister: widely used rifle has no future A widely used assault rifle has “no future” with the German military in its current form, Germany’s defense minister said April 22, escalating a dispute over the weapon’s alleged shortcomings. Ursula von der Leyen said last month that a study showed the G36 rifle has a...
 
 
Army photograph

Composites key to tougher, lighter armaments

Army photograph XM-360 test firing at Aberdeen Proving Ground, Md., in 2007, is shown. The Army is on the cusp of revolutionizing materials that go into armament construction, making for stronger, lighter and more durable weapo...
 

 

Northrop Grumman signs long-term agreement with Raytheon

Northrop Grumman has entered a long-term agreement with Raytheon to supply its LN-200 Inertial Measurement Unit for Raytheon optical targeting systems. The long-term agreement with Raytheon’s Space and Airborne Systems business extends through 2018. The LN-200 provides camera stabilization on optical targeting systems that conduct long-range surveillance and target acquisition for various...
 
 

NTTR supports first F-35B integration into USMC’s weapons school exercise

The Nevada Test and Training Range was part of history April 21, when four U.S. Marine Corps-assigned F-35B Lightning IIs participated in its first Marine Corps’ Final Exercise of the Weapons and Tactics Instructor course on the NTTR’s ranges. The Final Exercise, or FINEX, is the capstone event to the U.S. Marine Corps Marine Aviation...
 
 
AAR-Textron

AAR awarded new contract from Bell Helicopter Textron to support T64 engines

AAR announced April 22 that Bell Helicopter Textron Inc. awarded its Defense Systems & Logistics business unit a contract providing warehouse and logistics services in support of upgrading T64 engines for the Bell V-280 Val...
 




0 Comments


Be the first to comment!


Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

You may use these HTML tags and attributes: <a href="" title=""> <abbr title=""> <acronym title=""> <b> <blockquote cite=""> <cite> <code> <del datetime=""> <em> <i> <q cite=""> <strike> <strong>