Defense

April 25, 2014

Engine test facility upgrade improves exhaust handling efficiency

Military and commercial aircraft engine developers rely on simulated altitude testing conducted at Arnold Engineering Development Complex’s, or AEDC,¬†engine test facility, or ETF for their research and development of engine capabilities.

The condition of the test facility determines the quality of the test and there is an ongoing upgrade project for two of the intercoolers that aid in handling engine exhaust in the C-Plant Exhaust System.

The large intercoolers, measuring 46 feet diameter at the widest section and 62 feet long, are an important configuration for handling large volumes of engine exhaust. When a turbine engine test is conducted inside the C-Plant test cells, the engine exhaust flowing from the engine can reach temperatures of approximately 850 degrees to 3,000 degrees Fahrenheit. To create the proper conditions and pressures for a test of up to 75,000 feet altitude and an engine capable of operating at 100,000 pounds of thrust, the C-Plant Exhaust System houses coolers and compressors that cool and draw the engine exhaust.

“The purpose of this project is to replace the aging cooling coils and demister pads in the WC11 and WC12 intercoolers located in the C-Plant Exhaust yard area,” said Marilyn Graves, the Aerospace Testing Alliance, or ATA, program manager for the C-Plant Exhaust intercooler upgrade. “Each intercooler, or cooler, has three banks of coils, bank A, B and C, with each bank housing 20 coils for a total of 60 coils to be replaced for each cooler.

“The intercoolers cool and dehumidify exhaust gas between stages of exhaust compression to improve compressor performance and efficiency and to keep the exhaust gas temperature within working limits of the equipment,” she said.¬†“The water-cooled coils currently located in coolers WC11 and WC12 have been in existence for the past 30 years. Leaks as well as damaged or sagging coils have reduced the efficiency of the coolers.”

Melissa Tate, the Air Force project manager for the upgrade, said the project is part of the Advanced Large Military Engine Capability Program, or ALMEC. ALMEC, an Air Force Materiel Command program, exists to improve and modernize key Air Force Aeropropulsion Test Facility systems.

Planning for the project began in 2009 and involved considerations for conducting testing during the removal and installation upgrade process as well as safety in removing and handling the coils and demister pads.

“There was a considerable amount of planning involved with the Intercooler Project – everything from generating specifications for the replacement coils and demister pads to laying out schedules for the installation to determine the length of an outage period needed,” Graves said.

“In addition, there was considerable planning regarding safety issues — what hazards would be encountered, what PPE (personal protective equipment) would be required (and) what equipment and skill level of worker was needed.”

The expected completion date for the project is the summer of 2014.




All of this week's top headlines to your email every Friday.


 
 

 

News Briefs February 27, 2015

Ukraine will start pulling back heavy weapons in the east Ukraine’s military says it will start pulling back its heavy weapons from the front line with Russian-backed separatists as required under a cease-fire agreement. The Defense Ministry said in a statement Feb. 26 that it reserved the right to revise its withdrawal plans in the...
 
 

Northrop Grumman’s AstroMesh reflector successfully deploys for NASA’s SMAP satellite

The NASA Jet Propulsion Laboratory successfully deployed the mesh reflector and boom aboard the Soil Moisture Active Passive spacecraft, a key milestone on its mission to provide global measurements of soil moisture. Launched Jan. 31, SMAP represents the future of Earth Science by helping researchers better understand our planet. SMAP’s unmatched data capabilities are enabled...
 
 
NASA photograph by Brian Tietz

NASA offers space tech grants to early career university faculty

NASA photograph by Brian Tietz Tensegrity research is able to simulate multiple forms of locomotion. In this image, a prototype tensegrity robot reproduces forward crawling motion. NASA’s Space Technology Mission Director...
 

 
navy-china

USS Fort Worth conducts CUES with Chinese Navy

The littoral combat ship USS Fort Worth (LCS 3) practiced the Code for Unplanned Encounters at Sea (CUES) with the People’s Liberation Army-Navy Jiangkai II frigate Hengshui (FFG 572) Feb. 23 enhancing the professional ma...
 
 

AEGIS tracks, simulates engagement of three short-range ballistic missiles

The Missile Defense Agency and sailors aboard the guided-missile destroyers USS Carney (DDG 64), USS Gonzalez (DDG 66), and USS Barry (DDG 52) successfully completed a flight test involving the Aegis Ballistic Missile Defense weapon system. At approximately 2:30 a.m., EST, Feb. 26, three short-range ballistic missile targets were launched near simultaneously from NASA’s Wallops...
 
 

DOD seeks novel ideas to shape its technological future

The Defense Department is seeking novel ideas to shape its future, and officials are looking to industry, small business, academia, start-ups, the public – anyone, really – to boost its ability to prevail against adversaries whose access to technology grows daily. The program, called the Long-Range Research and Development Plan, or LRRDP, began with an...
 




0 Comments


Be the first to comment!


Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

You may use these HTML tags and attributes: <a href="" title=""> <abbr title=""> <acronym title=""> <b> <blockquote cite=""> <cite> <code> <del datetime=""> <em> <i> <q cite=""> <strike> <strong>