Defense

May 7, 2014

NAWCWD’s Maverick team reduces ordnance repair time, cost

Naval Air Warfare Center Weapons Division’s engineers and scientists re-engineered the Maverick’s seeker dome cover to prevent damage and save future expense repairing the missile.

The Maverick Missile team at NAWCWD China Lake, Calif., teamed with Naval Air Systems Command to create two new processes to preserve the Maverick Air-to-Ground Missile 65-E and save money by keeping it operational in the fleet.

NAWCWD scientists and engineers re-engineered the seeker dome grey-seal repair procedures, and the dome cover for Maverick during the past three years to save the Navy time and money when the missile is in need of repair.

In 2011, during a weapons readiness review, a weapons officer asked if there was a way to get the missile turned around quicker when needing repair.

Paul Nickel, assistant program manager for logistics at NAVAIR’s Logistics Department had an answer.

“China Lake has an elaborate engineering team and prototype facility that can reverse engineer and do a lot of climatic testing out there,” he said. “Let’s have them come up with a solution for the seal. They can also reverse engineer the current dome cover and design something that is more durable.”

Until now, decommissioning the missile, repairing the seal and returning it to the fleet took a lot of time and resources.

“From when the Sailor in the fleet realizes he or she has a problem with the missile, to sending it to Maverick Depot, then to the repair facility, and getting the missile back to the fleet; in worst case scenario it’s a three year turn around and best case scenario is still 18 months,” Nickel said.  “That is way too long for the warfighter to be without a fleet asset. We knew if we put our best scientists on it at China Lake, we could come up with an efficient solution.”

The Maverick Air-to-Ground Missile 65-E seeker dome grey-seal repair shown is a new capability created at Naval Air Warfare Center Weapons Division by engineers and scientists to provide a fleet-available fix to the missile. Until now, decommissioning the missile, repairing the seal and returning it to the fleet could take up to three years in a worst case scenario.

NAWCWD developed a technique for Sailors to inspect and repair the seal in the fleet allowing for the missile to return active after it hardens in just a few days.

The new dome cover is an affordable replacement to aging, broken, and weathered dome covers that protect the seeker prior to flight operations.

“Our goal for the grey-seal and the dome cover was to try and reduce the need for maintenance or re-servicing and have the capability to repair in the field without decommissioning the missile,” said Barry Olson Jr., Maverick’s deputy assistant program manager for logistics at NAWCWD. “We have worked with the fleet in Miramar and have been successful. We are to the point of getting a factory quality seal in a deployed environment.”

Cmdr. Dion Edon, commander of Naval Air Force Atlantic, is one of the fleet commanders who has been directly affected by the changes to Maverick.

“The swift engagement by the Maverick Program had a direct impact on fleet operations,” Edon said. “The Carrier Air Wing was on station in a combat zone afloat, and all her Mavericks were affected. The repair procedures generated by the program allowed repair of these highly constrained and critical weapons on board and on station. Visibility of this effort was tracked at the highest level and the affected Strike Group Commander sent appreciative words for the repair efforts of these highly needed assets. In addition, the relieving aircraft carrier in route to the combat zone also benefitted from repair procedures prior to arriving on station due to the outstanding support from the Maverick Program team.”




All of this week's top headlines to your email every Friday.


 
 

 

Headlines July 23, 2014

News: Israel’s Iron Dome defense in line for tripled U.S. spending - Israel’s iron Dome missile defense system may end up getting triple the U.S. funding that the Defense Department sought for it in March. Ukraine asked U.S. for systems to counter Russian missiles - A month before the United States says a Russian missile likely brought...
 
 

News Briefs July 23, 2014

U.S. military deaths in Afghanistan at 2,194 As of July 22, 2014, at least 2,194 members of the U.S. military had died in Afghanistan as a result of the U.S.-led invasion of Afghanistan in late 2001, according to an Associated Press count. The AP count is three less than the Defense Department’s tally. At least...
 
 
Raytheon photograph

Raytheon completes key Air, Missile Defense Radar reviews

Raytheon photograph Partially-populated, full-sized Air and Missile Defense Radar array. Raytheon has completed two critical program reviews for the new Air and Missile Defense Radar, the U.S. Navy’s next generation integ...
 

 
Insitu photograph

Insitu demonstrates long endurance capabilities of Integrator unmanned aircraft

Insitu photograph Insitu’s Integrator unmanned aircraft recovers via SkyHook; the aircraft recently completed a 24-hour endurance flight. Insitu announced July 22 the successful 24-hour flight of its Integrator unmanned a...
 
 

NASA partners punctuate summer with spacecraft development advances

Spacecraft and rocket development is on pace this summer for NASA’s aerospace industry partners for the agency’s Commercial Crew Program as they progress through systems testing, review boards and quarterly sessions under their† Space Act Agreements with the agency. NASA engineers and specialists continue their review of the progress as the agency and partners move...
 
 

U.S. Navy selects Northrop Grumman for ship self-defense system

The U.S. Navy has awarded Northrop Grumman a $12 million task order for a full range of engineering services to continue modernizing the Ship Self-Defense System Mark 2. The contract has a potential value of $61 million over five years, if all options are exercised. SSDS MK2 is a combat system designed for anti-air defense...
 




0 Comments


Be the first to comment!


Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

You may use these HTML tags and attributes: <a href="" title=""> <abbr title=""> <acronym title=""> <b> <blockquote cite=""> <cite> <code> <del datetime=""> <em> <i> <q cite=""> <strike> <strong>