Tech

May 14, 2014

Interactive display provides pilots with real-time sonic boom information

The CISboomDA software integrates aircraft and environmental data with a real-time, local-area moving-map capable of displaying an aircraftís sonic boom footprint, allowing pilots to select a flight path to either avoid generating a sonic boom or to place the sonic boom in a specific location.

Aerospace engineers at NASA’s Armstrong Flight Research Center and Wyle Laboratories have developed a revolutionary software system capable of displaying the location and intensity of shock waves caused by supersonic aircraft.

When integrated into aircraft cockpits or ground-based control rooms, the new technology could enable pilots of future supersonic aircraft to make necessary flight-path adjustments to control the location and intensity of sonic booms.

Called the Cockpit Interactive Sonic Boom Display Avionics ñ CISBoomDA for short ñ the software technology could eventually play a key role in enabling supersonic flight over land by future “low-boom” aircraft that is currently prohibited by Federal Aviation Administration regulations.

Developed by aerospace engineer Ed Haering, technical lead for supersonic aerodynamics research at NASA Armstrong, and Ken Plotkin of Wyle Laboratories in El Segundo, Calif., the software application calculates an airplaneís sonic boom footprint using vehicle and flight parameters and current atmospheric conditions. Processed data provides real-time information regarding location and intensity of the airplaneís shock wave.

The CISBoomDA software can be used on current-generation supersonic aircraft, which generate loud sonic booms. Of greater interest, however, is its integration into future-generation “low-boom” civil aircraft, anticipated to be quiet enough for flight over populated areas.

“The class of vehicles weíre looking at will be very unobtrusive,” he said, “making ‘sonic puffs’ rather than sonic booms.”

Haering and other NASA researchers want to share this technology with companies developing supersonic military and commercial aircraft, avionics integrators supporting these aircraft, and with the Federal Aviation Administration. Supersonic flight over the continental U.S. is currently limited by strict regulations, which would have to be changed to accommodate even low-boom aircraft. NASA is coordinating with the FAA and the International Civil Aviation Organization regarding a possible future change to the existing rule. Software such as CISBoomDA could provide the FAA with a tool to approve flight plans, monitor flying aircraft, and review flight data to enforce regulations.

Researchers hope to test the real-time cockpit display in a NASA F/A-18 later this year and eventually integrate it into a low-boom experimental aircraft.

Haering and Laura Fobel, NASA Armstrongís Technology Transfer Officer, recently discussed information on the Cockpit Interactive Sonic Boom Display Avionics technology with potential partners during a webinar sponsored by Tech Briefs Media Group. Slides and audio from the webinar are available for viewing at https://event.webcasts.com/starthere.jsp?ei=1030818.

“We are actively seeking development partners to advance the CISBoomDA software,” said Fobel.




All of this week's top headlines to your email every Friday.


 
 

 
KMel Robotics photograph

Researchers test insect-inspired robots

KMel Robotics photograph These nano-quads are the size that the U.S. Army Research Laboratory Micro-Autonomous Systems Technology consortium of researchers envision. The current state is about as compact as a microwave oven. &n...
 
 
NASA photograph

NASA teams with South Korean agency to further improve air traffic management

NASA photograph Jaiwon Shin, NASAís associate administrator for Aeronautics Research, and Jaeboong Lee, president of the Korea Agency for Infrastructure Technology Advancement, signed an agreement Nov. 17, 2014 in Seoul, South...
 
 

Air Force funds research on thermal management technology for fighter aircraft

Managing heat that is generated by electronic subsystems in next-generation aircraft is a vexing challenge for aerospace system designers. In the interest of meeting this challenge, the Air Force recently provided follow-on funding for a Small Business Innovation Research effort that is identifying improved methods for heat conduction and rejection from system electronics for advanced...
 

 

Report: Major federal lab misused contract funds

Managers at one of the nation’s premier federal laboratories improperly used taxpayer funds to influence members of Congress and other officials as part of an effort to extend the lab’s $2.4 billion management contract, the U.S. Department of Energy’s Office of Inspector General said in a report Nov. 12. A review of documents determined that...
 
 

Teams announced for NASA 2015 robotics operations competition

Eight universities have advanced to the next round of “RASC-AL Robo-Ops,” a planetary rover robotics engineering competition sponsored by NASA and organized by the National Institute of Aerospace. The teams selected are California State University Long Beach, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge; San Jose State University in California; University of Buffalo in New York;...
 
 
NASA photograph by Ken Ulbrich

NASA tests revolutionary shape changing aircraft flap for first time

NASA photograph by Ken Ulbrich For taxi testing Oct. 31, 2014, at NASA’s Armstrong Flight Research Center at Edwards Air Force Base, Calif., the Adaptive Compliant Trailing Edge flap was extended to 20 degrees deflection. Fli...
 




0 Comments


Be the first to comment!


Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

You may use these HTML tags and attributes: <a href="" title=""> <abbr title=""> <acronym title=""> <b> <blockquote cite=""> <cite> <code> <del datetime=""> <em> <i> <q cite=""> <strike> <strong>