Events

June 4, 2014

National Museum of the U.S. Air Force breaks ground on new fourth building

From left to right: Amanda Wright Lane, great-grandniece of Orville and Wilbur Wright; Col. Cassie B. Barlow, commander of 88th Air Base Wing;† Fran Duntz, chairman of the Air Force Museum Foundation Board of Managers; Lt. Gen. (Ret.) Jack Hudson, director of the National Museum of the U.S. Air Force; Gen. Janet Wolfenbarger, commander of Air Force Materiel Command; Deborah Lee James, Secretary of the Air Force; Gen. Larry Spencer, Vice Chief of Staff of the Air Force; Lt. Gen. Stephen L. Hoog, assistant Vice Chief of Staff of the U.S. Air Force; David Dale, director of program, U.S. Army Corps of Engineers; Kyle E. Rooney, vice president and general manager of Turner Construction Co.; and CMSgt. Michael J. Warner, command chief for Air Force Materiel Command.

The National Museum of the U.S. Air Force broke ground June 3 on a new $35.4 million building that will house aircraft from the museum’s Presidential, Research and Development (and Global Reach collection, as well as a new and expanded Space Gallery.

The 224,000 square foot building, which is scheduled to open to the public in 2016, is being privately financed by the Air Force Museum Foundation, a non-profit organization chartered to assist in the development and expansion of the museum’s facilities.

According to Secretary of the Air Force Deborah Lee James, the museum’s fourth building will provide increased public awareness of the Air Force mission by giving visitors greater access to our legacy of aircraft, missiles, cyber expertise and other elements of Air Force heritage.

ìAs the Air Force’s window to the public, the museum is where the people come to learn about the history, mission and evolving capabilities of America’s Air Force and about the Airmen who are truly the foundation of everything we do, said James. ìIn today’s Air Force, we not only cherish our legacy; we live it every day with integrity, service, and excellence. These core values guide our actions and make us the best Air Force in the world. I thank the Air Force Museum Foundation for their support and assistance in making this facility a reality.

In December 2013, the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, Louisville District, awarded the contract for the building to Turner Construction Co. of Washington, D.C. Since then a significant amount of planning and design work has taken place to meet the museum’s requirements for the fourth building, said Turner Construction Co. Vice President and General Manager Kyle E. Rooney.

ìSince the fourth building is similar in size and shape to the museum’s three existing hangars, we had some good templates to work from, but we also have some unique challenges to navigate through as well, said Rooney. ìInnovative solutions are part of what we do, so we are looking forward to getting started with the construction phase.

Although the construction phase is set to begin, the Air Force Museum Foundation will continue fundraising toward their campaign goal of $46 million, which would provide for further options such as theatrical lighting, a west tow path, and an additional cafe, as well as educational requirements including science, technology, engineering and mathematics (STEM) Learning Nodes and wireless capability in the building, said Air Force Museum Foundation, Inc. Chairman Fran Duntz.

ìWe’re extremely pleased to assist the Air Force with financing for the fourth building, and we’re fully committed to achieving our campaign goal so that the entire potential of the fourth building can be realized, said Duntz.

Included among the many benefits of the fourth building will be the relocation of the popular Presidential and R&D Gallery aircraft including SAM 26000 (Air Force One), which served eight presidents from President Kennedy to President Clinton, and the only remaining XB-70, from a controlled-access portion of Wright-Patterson Air Force Base to the main museum campus where they will be accessible to all visitors. In addition, the museum will be able to display some artifacts that had previously been kept in storage such as the Titan IV launch vehicle, or kept outside such as the C-141 Hanoi Taxi and the C-130E.

For Museum Director Lt. Gen. (Ret.) Jack Hudson, the educational possibilities including those involving STEM is what is really exciting to envision.

“When you look at the various aircraft, the unique spacecraft and unparalleled technology that will be on display in the fourth building, then you can begin to see why it will be the perfect setting for educational programs – especially those that inspire and motivate our youth toward an Air Force or STEM career,” Hudson said. “Many museums may focus largely on the achievements of the past, but at the National Museum of the U.S. Air Force, we also are a catalyst for the achievements of the future.”

The Air Force Museum Foundation, Inc. was established in 1960 as a philanthropic, non-profit organization to assist the Air Force in the development and expansion of the facilities of the National Museum of the United States Air Force, and to undertake and advance programs and activities supporting the museum. The Foundation raises funds through its membership program, the Air Force Museum Theatre, Museum Store, flight simulators and Valkyrie Cafe, as well as from direct donations.

The National Museum of the United States Air Force, located at Wright-Patterson Air Force Base near Dayton, Ohio, is the service’s national institution for preserving and presenting the Air Force story from the beginning of military flight to today’s war on terrorism. It is free to the public and features more than 360 aerospace vehicles and missiles and thousands of artifacts amid more than 17 acres of indoor exhibit space. Each year about one million visitors from around the world come to the museum. For more information, visit www.nationalmuseum.af.mil.




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