Business

July 3, 2014

Northrop Grumman receives $3.6 billion multiyear contract for 25 E-2D Advanced Hawkeye aircraft

Northrop Grumman’s E-2D Advanced Hawkeye program has been awarded a $3.6 billion multiyear contract to deliver 25 new E-2D Advanced Hawkeyes to the U.S. Navy. The E-2D Advanced Hawkeye provides unprecedented, 360-degree surveillance to the warfighter, and every aircraft has been delivered on schedule and on budget, since the first E-2D Advanced Hawkeye delivery in 2007.

The U.S. Navy has awarded Northrop Grumman a $3.6 billion fixed price, incentive fee multiyear contract to deliver 25 new E-2D Advanced Hawkeye aircraft, bringing the total number of aircraft on contract to 50.

Developed and produced by Northrop Grumman, the E-2D Advanced Hawkeye is the world’s only aircraft specifically designed as a carrier-based airborne early warning and control (AEW&C) system. With its structurally distinctive design – a rotating rotodome and four vertical stabilizer tail configuration – the E-2D Advanced Hawkeye provides unprecedented, 360-degree surveillance to the warfighter.

“The E-2D Advanced Hawkeye is the Navy’s primary airborne early warning and battle management command and control platform,” said Navy Capt. John S. Lemmon, program manager, E-2/C-2 Airborne Tactical Data System Program Office (PMA-231). “I’m confident that as the E-2D Advanced Hawkeye attains initial operational capability later this year, the E-2D will continue to be ready, relevant and capable for decades to come and continue serving the Navy Carrier Strike Group with distinction.”

As the only DOD designed, tested and in-production AEW&C platform, the E-2D Advanced Hawkeye has undergone a significant transformation from previous E-2 models, resulting in revolutionary capabilities. This includes the new, more powerful AN/APY-9 radar system, exclusive to the E-2D Advanced Hawkeye, which represents a two-generational leap in radar technology and allows the warfighter to “see” a greater number of targets at much greater distances – as well as new avionics and a glass cockpit.

“A multiyear procurement of these additional E-2Ds will take advantage of efficient, stable production lines at both Northrop Grumman and our suppliers, and will generate significant cost savings for taxpayers and the Navy,” said Bart LaGrone, vice president, E-2/C-2 Programs, Northrop Grumman Aerospace Systems. “It’s a win-win – our warfighters will get the advanced AEW&C technology that the E-2D Advanced Hawkeye brings, at a lower cost for taxpayers.”

The Northrop Grumman-led supplier team – “Team Hawkeye” – brings together the best in industry, ensuring the continued success of the Advanced Hawkeye program. Lockheed Martin Naval Electronics and Surveillance Systems, Syracuse, New York, serves as the principal AN/APY-9 radar system supplier and is teamed with Northrop Grumman Electronic Systems, Baltimore, and Raytheon’s Space and Airborne Systems, El Segundo, California. Rolls-Royce (Indianapolis, IN) provides the T-56-A engines while BAE Systems, Greenlawn, New York, is responsible for the identification friend or foe system and L-3 Communications Randtron Antenna Systems, Menlo Park, California, developed the ultra-high frequency electronically scanned array antenna.

“Since the first E-2D Advanced Hawkeye delivery in 2007, every aircraft has been delivered on schedule and on budget,” LaGrone said. “It is this kind of proven program performance and partnership with our customer that results in a multiyear contract – validating that the E-2D Advanced Hawkeye is the right system at the right time for the right cost.”

The Navy’s E-2D Advanced Hawkeye program of record is for 75 aircraft, of which Northrop Grumman has already delivered 13 production aircraft.




All of this week's top headlines to your email every Friday.


 
 

 

Headlines January 30, 2015

News: Taliban claims responsibility for attack on Americans at military base near airport - The Taliban claimed responsibility Jan. 30 for a shooting incident at a military base attached to Kabul’s international airport yesterday that killed three American civilian contractors and an Afghan national, saying the attacker had infiltrated the ranks of the security forces. Commission...
 
 

News Briefs January 30, 2015

Military judge weighs restrictions on Gitmo female guards A military judge is deciding whether to continue restricting the use of female guards at Guantanamo. Navy Capt. J. Kirk Waits heard closing arguments Jan. 29 at the base in Cuba during a pretrial hearing for Abd al-Hadi al-Iraqi. Waits didn’t say when he will rule. Hadi...
 
 
Air Force photograph by 1st Lt. Jake Bailey

Cope South experts exchange knowledge, techniques

Air Force photograph by 1st Lt. Jake Bailey TSgt. Sam Bishop, center left, and SSgt. Jeffrey Stephens discuss propeller maintenance with Bangladesh air force maintainers, from the 101st Special Flying Unit, during exercise Cope...
 

 

Air Force names 2-star to lead F-35 Integration Office

With the initial operating capability date of the F-35 Lightning II quickly approaching, the Air Force appointed Maj. Gen. Jeffrey Harrigian as the director of a larger Air Force F-35 Integration Office, Feb. 1. In addition to gaining new leadership, the F-35 Integration Office will also grow from a staff of four to 12 and...
 
 
boeing-ana2

Boeing announces ANA’s commitment to more jetliners

Airline continues fleet modernization with Boeing airplanes Boeing and All Nippon Airways announced Jan. 30 the airline’s intent to purchase three 787-10 Dreamliners to add additional flexibility to the airline’s 787 fleet....
 
 
Air Force photograph by Scott M. Ash

Air Force risks becoming too small to succeed under sequestration

Air Force photograph by Scott M. Ash Air Force Chief of Staff Gen. Mark A. Welsh III testifies before the Senate Armed Services Committee Jan. 28, 2015, in Washington, D.C., as Commandant of the Marine Corps Gen. Joesph F. Dunf...
 




0 Comments


Be the first to comment!


Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

You may use these HTML tags and attributes: <a href="" title=""> <abbr title=""> <acronym title=""> <b> <blockquote cite=""> <cite> <code> <del datetime=""> <em> <i> <q cite=""> <strike> <strong>