Space

July 16, 2014

NASA turns over next-gen air traffic management tool to FAA

As seen in this image, Terminal Sequencing and Spacing technology enables air traffic controllers to better manage the spacing between aircraft as they save both time and fuel and reducing emissions, flying more efficient approaches into airports.

A new NASA-developed computer software tool designed to aid air traffic controllers was presented to the Federal Aviation Administration during a ceremony July 14 at the agency’s headquarters in Washington.

The Terminal Sequencing and Spacing technology will enable air traffic controllers to better manage the spacing between aircraft as they fly more efficient approaches into airports, saving both time and fuel and reducing emissions. TSS is the another step in NASA’s support of the development of a Next Generation Air Transportation System, or NextGen, which is a joint multi-agency and industry initiative to modernize and upgrade the nation’s air traffic control system.

“With TSS, NASA’s aeronautics innovators have delivered to the FAA another valuable tool that will soon benefit our environment, our economy and every individual traveler,” said Jaiwon Shin, NASA’s associate administrator for aeronautics research.

The software enables the routine use of what are called Performance Based Navigation procedures, resulting in fewer course and altitude changes, while also reducing the frequency of necessary communications between controllers and pilots.

The TSS tool provides information to controllers about the speeds they should assign to aircraft as they follow fuel-efficient, continuous-descent arrival procedures while passing through a region of airspace surrounding an airport called the TRACON (Terminal Radar Approach Control), covering a distance from an airport of about 50 miles.

NASA’s Airspace Systems Program, which is part of the agency’s Aeronautics Research Mission Directorate, began the research that led to the development of TSS in 2009, with prototype development beginning in 2011. NASA used these prototypes to test TSS in 16 high-fidelity simulations involving controllers and pilots.

The FAA is working to implement the tool in the next five years, targeting an initial operating capability around 2018. The initial site has not yet been determined and implementation will depend on funding availability.

Through a highly effective technology transfer process enabled by the NASA/FAA Research Transition Teams, NASA has delivered to the FAA three other key software tools that enable more efficient air traffic and fuel savings.




All of this week's top headlines to your email every Friday.


 
 

 

Northrop, Navy celebrate legacy of EA-6B Prowler

Northrop Grumman photograph by Edgar Mills The U.S. Navy’s last operational EA-6B Prowler, designed and built by Northrop Grumman, lifts off from Naval Air Station Whidbey Island, Wash. in a ceremonial fly-away June 27 from its long time operational base. The Navy is retiring the Prowler after nearly 45 years of service.   The U.S....
 
 
Air Force photograph by Capt. Tania Bryan

NORTHERN EDGE provides environment for testing new capabilities

Air Force photograph by Capt. Tania Bryan Aircraft from test and evaluation squadrons across the Air Force line up on the Joint Base Elmendorf-Richardson flightline. Northern Edge is Alaska’s premier joint training exercise d...
 
 

Lockheed signs agreements for two full-flight simulators

Lockheed Martin Commercial Flight Training and Airbus have signed a frame contract enabling Airbus to expedite procurement of flight simulation devices for their customers, Airbus training centers and their affiliates worldwide. The frame contract emphasizes the shared intent to partner on future training programs, and combines Airbus’ and Lockheed Martin Commercial Flight Training’s expert...
 

 
Air Force photograph by Alex R. Lloyd

Ogden ALC completes test flight after F-35B STOVL mods

Air Force photograph by Alex R. Lloyd A Marine Corps F-35B STOVL Joint Strike Fighter aircraft completes its first-ever check flight at Hill AFB, Utah, June 18, 2015. The aircraft was undergoing a functional check flight follow...
 
 
Lockheed Martin photograph

Fourth Lockheed Martin-built MUOS secure comm satellite shipped

Lockheed Martin photograph On June 28, MUOS-4, the next satellite scheduled to join the U.S. Navy’s Mobile User Objective System secure communications network, shipped to Cape Canaveral from Lockheed Martin’s satellite manu...
 
 

Headlines June 26, 2015

Business: A look inside Lockheed Martin’s space-age operations – At Lockheed Martin Space Systems Company, we have the privilege of working for ambitious customers; their plans include missions to Mars, examinations of asteroids, and scientific explorations that push ever deeper into the solar system. Canada does not have right weapons to help Ukraine, defense minister...
 




0 Comments


Be the first to comment!


Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

You may use these HTML tags and attributes: <a href="" title=""> <abbr title=""> <acronym title=""> <b> <blockquote cite=""> <cite> <code> <del datetime=""> <em> <i> <q cite=""> <s> <strike> <strong>