Veterans

July 21, 2014

Airman’s remains returned home 62 years after his death

Tags:
SrA. Sarah Hall-Kirchner
Elwood, Ind.

Members of the Scott Air Force Base Honor Guard transport the remains of Airman 3rd Class Howard Martin during a dignified arrival July 10, 2014, at the Indianapolis International Airport, Indiana. Martin died during a C-124 crash in 1952 and his remains were recovered earlier in 2014.

The remains of 17 service members were recovered by the Joint Prisoner of War/Missing in Action Accounting Command and Joint Task Force team from a 1952 aircraft crash site.

Among the casualties was Airman 3rd Class Howard Martin, of Elwood, Ind., whose remains returned home to rest July 10.

Waiting at the Indianapolis International Airport for him were his family and friends who gathered on the tarmac to receive his body along with members of the Scott Air Force Base, Ill., Honor Guard who performed the dignified transfer. The Honor Guard also served as pallbearers for the funeral ceremony, which was held July 12.

“I can hardly describe the anticipation,” said Paul Martin, the eldest surviving brother. “Mom and dad (who are both deceased) both kept thinking that one of these days they’ll find him and bring him home so they bought three cemetery plots rather than two.”

His long awaited homecoming came after Department of Defense scientists from the Armed Forces DNA Identification Laboratory identified the remains from the 11 crewmembers and 41 passengers who were aboard the a C-124 Globemaster II that crashed on Nov. 22, 1952, about 50 miles east of Anchorage, Alaska. All aboard were presumed dead and search parties were unable to locate or recover those on board at the time due to adverse weather conditions.

Paul said he was overwhelmed with emotions when he learned that the site had been uncovered earlier this year. He and his six siblings received his brother’s wallet which contained Howard’s driver’s license and Social Security card.

“A melting glacier allowed them to find my brother,” Paul Martin said. “He came down 8,000 feet and 12 miles to be discovered 60 years later.”

An Alaskan National Guard helicopter crew spotted aircraft wreckage and debris in a melting glacier during a training mission near the original crash site on June 9, 2012. The discovery launched a search and recovery attempt by the Joint POW/MIA Accounting Command and Joint Task Force team where they discovered and identified the remains through DNA on April 18.

Paul and his sister, Kay, had given DNA samples earlier, hoping that one day they would be able to bring their brother home. Sixty-two years later, their brother’s remains were finally here.

Hundreds of people including veterans and people as far away as Michigan lined the streets of Elwood waving American flags to pay their respects to the fallen airman. As a testament to Howard’s service and sacrifice to the country, the mayor of Elwood named July 12 as Airman 3rd Class Howard Martin Remembrance Day.

Paul Martin, the oldest brother of Airman 3rd Class Howard Martin, wipes a tear from his eye during his brother’s funeral July 12, 2014, in Elwood, Ind. Howard Martin died November 22, 1952, during a C-124 crash in Alaska. His remains were not recovered or identified until earlier in 2014 and were returned home July 10.




All of this week's top headlines to your email every Friday.


 
 

 

Headlines September 29, 2014

News: U.S. military limits warplanes used for Islamic State bombingsĀ - The U.S. is relying mostly on warplanes already positioned in the region for its air war against the Islamic State, as opposed to dispatching a major buildup of aerial forces that happened in previous campaigns.   Business: At DOD, it’s use-it-or-lose-it seasonĀ - As fiscal 2014...
 
 

News Briefs September 29, 2014

Navy awards ship design grant to UNO The University of New Orleans has received a $210,000 grant from the Navy s Office of Naval Research to test information gathering and analysis techniques intended to improve warship design. The goal for warship designers is to produce a vessel that can be repurposed numerous times throughout its...
 
 
Courtesy photograph

TACP-M ties it all together

Air National Guard photograph by SSgt. Lealan Buehrer Tactical air control party specialists with the 169th Air Support Operations Squadron survey an enemy-controlled landing zone before calling in close-air support Aug. 14, 20...
 

 
Air Force photograph by A1C Thomas Spangler

Nellis aggressor squadron inactivated

Air Force photograph by A1C Thomas Spangler SSgt. Justin White signals to Maj. Sam Joplin to begin taxiing a 65th Aggressor Squadron F-15 Eagle to the runway Sept. 18, 2014, at Nellis Air Force Base Nev. The roles and responsib...
 
 
Army photograph by SSgt. Mary S. Katzenberger

82nd Airborne helps commemorate 70th Anniversary of Operation Market Garden

Army photograph by SSgt. Mary S. Katzenberger A paratrooper assigned to the 82nd Airborne Division, reflects near the grave of a British paratrooper at the Arnhem Oosterbeek War Cemetery, Sept. 14, 2014, in the Netherlands. The...
 
 

Raytheon awarded $251 million Tomahawk missile contract

The U.S. Navy has awarded Raytheon a $251 million contract to procure Tomahawk Block IV tactical cruise missiles for fiscal year 2014 with an option for 2015. The contract calls for Raytheon to build and deliver Tomahawk Block IV cruise missiles to the U.S. Navy and U.K. Royal Navy. Raytheon will also conduct flight tests...
 




0 Comments


Be the first to comment!


Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

You may use these HTML tags and attributes: <a href="" title=""> <abbr title=""> <acronym title=""> <b> <blockquote cite=""> <cite> <code> <del datetime=""> <em> <i> <q cite=""> <strike> <strong>