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July 30, 2014

News Briefs July 30, 2014

U.S. military deaths in Afghanistan at 2,197

As of July 29, 2014, at least 2,197 members of the U.S. military had died in Afghanistan as a result of the U.S.-led invasion of Afghanistan in late 2001, according to an Associated Press count.

At least 1,819 military service members have died in Afghanistan as a result of hostile action, according to the military’s numbers.

Outside of Afghanistan, the department reports at least 135 more members of the U.S. military died in support of Operation Enduring Freedom. Of those, 11 were the result of hostile action.

The AP count of total OEF casualties outside of Afghanistan is four more than the department’s tally.

The Defense Department also counts three military civilian deaths.

Since the start of U.S. military operations in Afghanistan, 19,889 U.S. service members have been wounded in hostile action, according to the Defense Department. AP 

Body of child stowaway found in US cargo plane

A Pentagon spokesman says the body of a teen stowaway was found and removed from a compartment above the rear landing gear of a U.S. Air Force C-130J cargo aircraft after it landed at a military base in Germany.

Navy Rear Adm. John Kirby said the stowaway was a black male who may have been of African origin. He said the plane stopped in several African countries before it arrived July 28 at Germany’s Ramstein Air Base.

Kirby said the body was found during a routine post-flight maintenance inspection of the cargo plane. He said the body had been turned over to German authorities for autopsy, and the matter is under investigation.

He said it is not known when or where the stowaway entered the landing gear wheel well. AP 

Two military satellites launched on Delta 4 rocket

A Delta 4 rocket has lifted off from the Cape Canaveral Air Force Station, Fla., carrying two satellites for the U.S. Air Force.

The United Launch Alliance rocket was launched the evening of July 29. It will place a pair of satellites into orbit for the Air Force. The twin spacecraft will support U.S. Strategic Command space surveillance operations. They will also be used to help track space debris.

The launch was scrubbed July 23 because of an issue with a ground equipment control system. AP




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Headlines November 17, 2014

News: Fight over A-10 re-opens Hill, Air Force divide - After a relatively quiet summer, the battle for the future of the A-10 Warthog exploded in the last two weeks, reopening deep fissures between Congress and the Air Force that seem to show the two sides at a total stalemate. Chances for sequester relief fade as...
 
 

News Briefs Nov, 17, 2014

Second stealthy destroyer starting to take shape The second of three stealthy destroyers under construction in Maine is starting to take shape. The Navy says it has completed the hoisting of the 1,000-ton composite deckhouse onto the 610-foot hull of the future USS Michael Monsoor. It took four cranes to complete the job Nov. 14....
 
 
NASA photograph by Jim Yungel

NASA DC-8 continues west Antarctic ice study

NASA photograph by Jim Yungel The Thurston Island calving front off of western Antarctica as seen from the window of NASA’s DC-8 flying observatory Nov. 5, 2014. NASA’s DC-8 flying laboratory has two weeks of suppor...
 

 
NASA photograph by Emmett Given

NASA opens registration for 2015 Exploration Rover Challenge

NASA photograph by Emmett Given Pedaling across a simulated alien landscape of rock, craters and shifting sand is one of the nearly 90 teams of high school, college and university students from across the United States and arou...
 
 
Lockheed Martin photograph

Lockheed Martin begins final assembly of NASA’s next Mars lander

Lockheed Martin photograph Technicians in a Lockheed Martin clean room prepare NASA’s InSight Mars lander for propulsion proof and leak testing on Oct. 31, 2014. Following the test, the lander was moved to another clean room ...
 
 
Air Force photograph by Isaac Cruz

‘Batman’ fix to sustain C-5s for decades, saving millions

Robins Air Force Base, Ga., has hit another milestone by being the first to complete a new major structural repair on a C-5M which will bring in millions of dollars in revenue and sustain the Air Force’s fleet for decades...
 




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