Business

August 5, 2014

UTC to design, build nacelle systems for the Boeing 787-10 Dreamliner

UTC Aerospace Systems’ Aerostructures business has been selected Boeing to extend its provision of complete nacelle systems for the 787 Dreamliner to include the 787-10 variant.

The Aerostructures business was awarded the contract to provide inlets, thrust reversers, fan cowls and exhaust systems for both the GE and Rolls-Royce engine options on the 787-8 and 787-9 in 2004.

As with the previous contract, the 787-10 agreement covers design and manufacture of nacelle systems for those engine variants for the higher capacity version of the Dreamliner. The Aerostructures business headquartered in Chula Vista, Calif., will also supply aftermarket support of the 787-10 nacelle systems through its global network of maintenance, repair and overhaul facilities and spares distribution centers. UTC Aerospace Systems is a unit of United Technologies Corp.

“After being part of the Boeing 787 Dreamliner journey from concept to production for the past ten years, we’re gratified Boeing has selected us to continue the next leg with them,” said Aerostructures President Marc Duvall. “With outstanding dispatch reliability for our nacelle components on the in-service 787-8, we look forward to providing Boeing with the nacelle systems for the newest member of its Dreamliner family.”

The Boeing 787-10 Dreamliner is the third and longest member of the super-efficient 787 family. Launched in June 2013, the 787-10 can carry 323 passengers up to 7,000 nautical miles, which covers more than 90 percent of the world’s passenger routes.

In addition to the nacelle system, UTC Aerospace Systems also provides more than 20 proprietary components and systems for the Boeing 787 Dreamliner commercial jet.

UTC Aerospace Systems designs, manufactures and services integrated systems and components for the aerospace and defense industries.  UTC Aerospace Systems supports a global customer base with significant worldwide manufacturing and customer service facilities.




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