Defense

August 18, 2014

Bomber crews showcase take-off talents

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SSgt. Jason McCasland
Barksdale AFB, La.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=F_8qr7ojpWg&feature=player_embedded

A B-52H Stratofortress starts its engines during a Minimum Interval Takeoff on Barksdale Air Force Base, La., Aug. 14, 2014. Common place during the Cold War, a MITO challenges crews to get multiple aircraft airborne as quickly as possible in response to an alert call.

Ten B-52H Stratofortress bombers took part in a minimum interval takeoff exercise, or MITO, showcasing ground and aircrew’s abilities, at Barksdale Air Force Base, La., Aug. 14.

During a MITO, each aircraft is equipped with eight starter cartridges filled with gunpowder, that allows the engines to start up faster than a normal takeoff.

“We are practicing for a real world event; if something were to happen, this is how Barksdale would respond,” said SrA. Mitchell Dexter, 96th Aircraft Maintenance Unit aircraft powerplant†specialist. †”We use starter carts so we are able to get the engines started faster than using traditional methods, which allows us to get the planes started and taxing within minutes from the alert call.”

Common place during the Cold War, a MITO challenges crews to get multiple aircraft off the ground within 15 minutes of initial alert notices.

“The MITO proves the teamwork between both the aircrews and ground crews is solid,” said Col. David Foote, 2nd Maintenance Group commander. “This allows Barksdale to provide nuclear deterrence giving our allies the assurance that we have the capability needed to deter our adversaries.”

SrA. Mitchell Dexter, 2nd Aircraft Maintenance Squadron crew chief, communicates with aircrew in the cockpit of a B-52H Stratofortress during a Minimum Interval Takeoff on Barksdale Air Force Base, La., Aug. 14, 2014. A MITO is executed to allow the B-52 to quickly respond and deliver precision munitions at a moment’s notice. Starter cartridges, filled with gun powder, are used during this takeoff instead of the standard, compressed-air takeoff.

While the small launch window is challenging in itself, turbulence created from the leading aircraft can create rough air for the following planes, testing the aircrew’s skills.

“Our maintainers and operators did a magnificent job preparing and executing this exercise,” said Col. Kristin Goodwin, 2nd Bomb Wing commander. “This launch is a testament to our capability and what our crews are able to accomplish.”

Although the days of the Cold War are over, a MITO showcases the operational capability Barksdale continues to maintain, proving aircrew and maintenance personnel are ready to perform and execute at a moment’s notice.

“A MITO launch is another example of the flexible and responsive combat capability the B-52 can project on a global scale,” Goodwin said. “Our mission is to provide decisive nuclear deterrence and conventional firepower anytime, anywhere. That’s not a statement … a MITO is one way we prove it.”




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