Business

August 20, 2014

Lockheed Martin introduces maritime test bed

Using a newly developed advanced maritime test bed, Lockheed Martin recently demonstrated how continually evolving technologies such as data fusion and predictive analytics can be used to share intelligence quickly and securely – even in limited bandwidth naval settings.

This new software test platform, designed to mimic different naval environments at sea and ashore, allowed Lockheed Martin to validate sophisticated intelligence, communications and sensor systems before they are introduced in an operational environment.

“The Navy is confronted with unique challenges that require superior, faster intelligence sharing,” said Dr. Rob Smith, vice president of C4ISR for Lockheed Martin’s Information Systems and Global Solutions. “The Maritime Test Bed provides a cost effective, risk reduction platform that can be used for realistic testing to demonstrate what is possible with the end goal of providing real-time, decision-quality intelligence for the Navy.”

In its recent demonstration, Lockheed Martin used its test bed to illustrate how the Navy could fuse simulated Aegis radar data with other integrated intelligence, surveillance and reconnaissance (ISR) sensor data to provide a comprehensive picture of the battlespace.

Throughout the scenario, the test bed collected, analyzed and processed the data, then distributed to simulated platforms at sea and on shore. This collaborative atmosphere allowed users to operate more efficiently, since all units had access to integrated ISR-related activities, which in turn improved situational awareness and battle management planning.

The maritime test bed was developed with open standards software infrastructure, which allows it to leverage multiple information sources and databases for testing.

For testing highly sensitive technologies, the maritime test bed can be linked to the Secret Defense Research and Engineering Network (SDREN) as well as the Defense Research and Engineering Network (DREN). Lockheed Martin will use the test bed with all customers who wish to test C4ISR capabilities to foster a more seamless transition into real-world operations.




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