Health & Safety

March 29, 2012

Proper safety equipment essential for safe kids

Written by: anradmin
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Cruz Bautista and Devin Fonseca

Garrison Safety is always on the lookout for children being safe while participating in various activities throughout Fort Irwin.  Whether it’s bicycle riding, skateboarding, riding scooters, skating, or playing on the playgrounds, safe play should be a priority, employees of Garrison Safety say.

“Kids Caught Being Safe” is a program designed to encourage children to play safely in the community. The rewards go beyond just staying safe “” Garrison Safety rewards safe play with a bright yellow backpack full of goodies and entry into a drawing for a Wii in May.

But the efforts of the safety office aren’t enough without parent support. According to www.safekids.org, bicycles cause more childhood injuries than any other product besides cars, yet not all children on Fort Irwin wear their helmets properly. A good fitting helmet with a chin strap fastened can provide valuable protection for a child in case of an accident. An unserviceable helmet should never be repaired, but instead replaced so the integrity of the helmet is not jeopardized.  Knee pads, elbow pads and wrist pads can also help keep kids safe while riding skateboards, bicycles, or scooters.

Kids should know the proper way to cross a street, look both ways before crossing, and never run into a street. Garrison Safety employees have observed many kids riding through intersections without ever looking for danger or getting off of their bikes or scooters to cross a road, as is the proper procedure.

With the support of parents and the community, all kids at Fort Irwin can safely enjoy bicycling and other fun outdoor activities.




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