Health & Safety

August 16, 2012

Join Operation Battle Blackout to help Irwin conserve energy

Information provided by Fort Irwin Garrison

What is Operation Battle Blackout and why should you make an effort to save electricity on post?

Just like you receive an electric bill at home, Fort Irwin Garrison also receives a bill for its electricity usage. During the summer months and periods of extreme heat, Southern California Edison sends out the baseline for electricity usage. When the installation uses less than the baseline, we are rewarded with credits toward our next month’s balance.

Through your hard work, the Garrison saved $2,586.80 out of a possible $4,000 on July 12. This was one of our best energy reduction days this summer. Last year, on July 4, 2011 we saved slightly over $3,000. It all adds up and we need your help. Whether you live in the housing, or you’re an employee who works in the cantonment area, you can make a difference.

The money saved through energy reduction goes right back into quality-of-life projects and operational funds.

What you should do:

Across NTC:

Throughout the summer, between noon and 8 p.m.:

Only use the electricity you require, avoid wasting electricity

Turn off any unused lights, equipment, or appliances

Where possible, refrain from making demands on the electrical system.

Barbecue or cook later in the evening.

Keep doors shut. Keep cold in and hot out. Works on buildings,

refrigerators, and freezers.

 

Workplace:

Turn off any unnecessary overhead lights / use task lighting

 

Whenever possible for your work:

Completely turn off lights and equipment in unoccupied spaces

Set your thermostat to 78 degrees

Turn off all personal desktop printers, use networked printers

Turn off unnecessary LaserJet printers

Turn off computer monitors if not in use

 

Housing:

Defer use of energy intensive appliances until after 8 p.m.

Examples: washers, dryers, vacuums, dishwashers, etc.

Set your air conditioning thermostat to 78 degrees

Turn off ceiling fans and lights in unoccupied spaces




All of this week's top headlines to your email every Friday.


 
 

 

Alcohol use and consent explained

What is consent? The Uniformed Code of Military Justice defines consent as words or overt acts indicating a freely given agreement to the sexual conduct at issue by a competent person. The Manual for Courts Martial, Article 120 clearly states that a person may be incapable of giving consent if they are mentally impaired or...
 
 

Good nutrition improves quality of life, health

Nutrition is one of the three pillars of the Performance Triad. Optimal nutrition, together with sufficient sleep and regular activity, is essential to preventing health problems and healing both illnesses and injuries. The nutrition target behaviors of the Performance Triad are: drinking at least eight cups (64 ounces) of water each day, consuming eight servings...
 
 
hand_washing

August is National Immunization Awareness Month

Images from www. army.mil The month of August brings everyone closer to the start of school, college and the 2014-15 flu season. So why add another “to do” to the list and get our vaccinations? Because we can reduce the ris...
 

 

Be aware of heat injury signs

Heat is the number one weather-related killer in the United States. On average, excessive heat claims more lives each year than floods, lightning, tornadoes and hurricanes combined. During extremely hot weather the body’s ability to cool itself is affected. This happens when the body heats too rapidly to cool itself properly, or when too much...
 
 

Sit less, move more!

Sleep, Activity, and Nutrition are the three pillars of the Army Surgeon General’s Performance Triad that will lead Army medicine from a healthcare system to a system for health. These three components directly contribute to our individual health and wellness, as well as to overall unit readiness and resilience. Let’s take a moment to focus...
 
 

Sleep critical to good health

Adequate sleep plays a critical role in maintaining one’s health. Yet, 42 percent of military personnel are getting less than five hours of sleep per night according to researchers at Madigan Army Medical Center in Tacoma, Wash. This particular study revealed various sleep disorders among active duty military members including sleep apnea, insomnia, and behaviorally...
 




0 Comments


Be the first to comment!


Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

You may use these HTML tags and attributes: <a href="" title=""> <abbr title=""> <acronym title=""> <b> <blockquote cite=""> <cite> <code> <del datetime=""> <em> <i> <q cite=""> <strike> <strong>


Directory powered by Business Directory Plugin