Health & Safety

October 25, 2012

Lifestyle changes part of overall plan to prevent breast cancer

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Lt. Col. Crystal House
Assistant Deputy Commander for Nursing Weed Army Community Hospital NTC and Fort Irwin
Commissary_staff
Photo by Ken Drie, Public Affairs Office Cynthia Hernandez (right) and employees of the Fort Irwin Commissary wear pink in support of a Breast Cancer Awareness event held in the Commissary, Oct. 18. Nurses from United States Army Medical Department Activity were on hand to pass out information and talk to the community about early cancer detection and the importance of self examination. To learn more about breast cancer prevention visit the American Cancer Society at: http://www.cancer.org/

Although more and more people are becoming aware of the fact that breast cancer is a significant concern for females across the population, many fail to realize the role lifestyle plays in its prevention and management.

Recent evidence supports the link between obesity and breast cancer risk. Thus, controlling one’s weight would also contribute to reducing the risk of developing breast cancer and preventing reoccurrence in survivors. Due to the fact that breast cancer risk is associated with a high body mass index, high calorie intake, and a lack of physical activity, one of the first steps to prevention is attaining an active lifestyle and practicing calorie control within one’s diet.

A physically active lifestyle, combined with weight management and a calorie controlled, low-fat diet high in vegetables, fruits, fiber and low in starch, processed foods and red meat intake are important components to reducing the risk. More importantly, with early detection and treatment, most people continue to lead a normal life. In addition,
Along with improvements to your lifestyle, monthly breast self exams, regularly scheduled clinical breast exams by your healthcare provider and mammograms, based on your age and risk factors, are the best way to find breast cancer early.

Having a holistic plan that helps you detect the disease in its early stages is the best way to fight breast cancer. Talk to your healthcare provider to develop an early detection plan to reduce your risks and improve your chances in fighting breast cancer today.




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