Health & Safety

October 25, 2012

Lifestyle changes part of overall plan to prevent breast cancer

Tags:
Lt. Col. Crystal House
Assistant Deputy Commander for Nursing Weed Army Community Hospital NTC and Fort Irwin
Commissary_staff
Photo by Ken Drie, Public Affairs Office Cynthia Hernandez (right) and employees of the Fort Irwin Commissary wear pink in support of a Breast Cancer Awareness event held in the Commissary, Oct. 18. Nurses from United States Army Medical Department Activity were on hand to pass out information and talk to the community about early cancer detection and the importance of self examination. To learn more about breast cancer prevention visit the American Cancer Society at: http://www.cancer.org/

Although more and more people are becoming aware of the fact that breast cancer is a significant concern for females across the population, many fail to realize the role lifestyle plays in its prevention and management.

Recent evidence supports the link between obesity and breast cancer risk. Thus, controlling one’s weight would also contribute to reducing the risk of developing breast cancer and preventing reoccurrence in survivors. Due to the fact that breast cancer risk is associated with a high body mass index, high calorie intake, and a lack of physical activity, one of the first steps to prevention is attaining an active lifestyle and practicing calorie control within one’s diet.

A physically active lifestyle, combined with weight management and a calorie controlled, low-fat diet high in vegetables, fruits, fiber and low in starch, processed foods and red meat intake are important components to reducing the risk. More importantly, with early detection and treatment, most people continue to lead a normal life. In addition,
Along with improvements to your lifestyle, monthly breast self exams, regularly scheduled clinical breast exams by your healthcare provider and mammograms, based on your age and risk factors, are the best way to find breast cancer early.

Having a holistic plan that helps you detect the disease in its early stages is the best way to fight breast cancer. Talk to your healthcare provider to develop an early detection plan to reduce your risks and improve your chances in fighting breast cancer today.




All of this week's top headlines to your email every Friday.


 
 

 

Exchange resolves to promote healthier living

According to Sourcewire, nearly a quarter of Americans vow to get fit for the New Year. The Fort Irwin Exchange is doing its part to make it easier for Soldiers, and Families, to watch their “bottom lines” when making dining choices on and off duty. Dining in the Exchange’s Fort Irwin Food Court doesn’t have...
 
 

Avoid being a No Show

“No Shows” are missed medical appointments that may negatively impact your ability to access health care here. A No Show is defined as an appointment that is scheduled, but not cancelled or honored by the patient. A No Show is a lost opportunity to provide healthcare services to you and to another patient, who could...
 
 
CathyBellard_LVN_LeesySublett

Story Time teaches children about safety helmets

Miriam Fuentes, military spouse here, took her daughter Devannie to Story Time at the Fort Irwin library, March 12. Sergeant Steve Steiner, a health technician at Behavioral Health with MEDDAC, imitated the voices of characters...
 

 

Aiming to reduce stigma of TBI

National Brain Injury Awareness Month a time to get informed, get treatment In order for more individuals to seek treatment for traumatic brain injuries, the social stigma associated with that “invisible wound” must be reduced. That is the message Maj. Shirley Daniel, chief and program manager of the TBI/Concussive Injury Clinic at Weed Army Community...
 
 

March is National Brain Injury Aware- ness Month and Fort Irwin medical personnel will be informing the com- munity about the symptoms and dan- gers of traumatic brain injuries.

arch is National Brain Injury Aware- ness Month and Fort Irwin medical personnel will be informing the com- munity about the symptoms and dangers of traumatic brain injuries. Weekly radio broadcasts on KNTC 88.3 FM during the month, information booths in various locations, and activities with chil- dren will be held to provide the community...
 
 

Know the symptoms, dangers of brain injuries

A traumatic brain injury is a disruption of brain function resulting from a blow or jolt to the head or penetrating head injury. A TBI can occur on the battlefield, on the football field, on the playground, in a car accident, and even at home. There are four categories of TBI including mild, moderate, severe...
 




0 Comments


Be the first to comment!


Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

You may use these HTML tags and attributes: <a href="" title=""> <abbr title=""> <acronym title=""> <b> <blockquote cite=""> <cite> <code> <del datetime=""> <em> <i> <q cite=""> <strike> <strong>


Directory powered by Business Directory Plugin