Health & Safety

March 1, 2013

Don’t be a road warrior

Contribute to safety by heeding these tips when walking, driving

Safety is a shared responsibility for all members of the Fort Irwin Community. With a daily population of approximately 21,000 personnel including almost 6,000 family members, their Soldiers and our civilian workforce, it is imperative that we take that responsibility seriously. The following are some tips to improve road safety for everyone, courtesy of www.walkinginfo.org.

Safety tips for pedestrians

Be safe and be seen: make yourself visible to drivers

Wear bright/light colored clothing and reflective materials.

Carry a flashlight when walking at night.

Cross in a well-lit area at night.

Stand clear of buses, hedges, parked cars or other obstacles before crossing so drivers can see you.

Be smart and alert: avoid dangerous behaviors

Always walk on the sidewalk; if there is no sidewalk, walk facing traffic.

Stay sober; walking while impaired increases your chance of being struck.

Don’t assume vehicles will stop; make eye contact with drivers; don’t just look at the vehicle.

Don’t rely solely on pedestrian signals; look before you cross the road.

Be alert to engine noise or backup lights on cars when in parking lots and near on-street parking spaces.

Be careful at crossings: look before you step

Cross streets at marked crosswalks or intersections, if possible.

Obey traffic signals such as WALK/DON’T WALK signs.

Look left, right, and left again before crossing a street.

Watch for turning vehicles; make sure the driver sees you and will stop for you.

Look across ALL lanes you must cross and visually clear each lane before proceeding. Just because one motorist stops, do not presume drivers in other lanes can see you and will stop for you.

Don’t wear headphones or talk on a cell phones.

Safety tips for drivers

Be alert: watch for pedestrians at all times

Scan the road and the sides of the road ahead for potential pedestrians.

Before making a turn, look in all directions for pedestrians crossing.

Don’t drive distracted or after consuming alcohol or other drugs.

Do not use your cell phone while driving.

Look carefully behind your vehicle for approaching pedestrians before backing-up, especially small children.

For maximum visibility, keep your windshield clean and headlights on.

Be responsible: yield to pedestrians at crossings

Yield to pedestrians in crosswalks, whether marked or unmarked.

Yield to pedestrians when making right or left turns at intersections.

Do not block or park in crosswalks.

Be patient: drive the speed limit and avoid aggressive maneuvers

Never pass/overtake a vehicle that is stopped for pedestrians.

Obey speed limits and come to a complete stop at STOP signs.

Use extra caution when driving near children playing along the street or older pedestrians who may not see or hear you.

Always be prepared to stop for pedestrians.

Obey all posted speeds, especially in the housing area and near school zones

Remember, safety is a shared responsibility.




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