Health & Safety

April 5, 2013

Stay on top of RSV

It’s RSV time again – the time of year that many infants and young children become ill from this particular type of virus.

Respiratory Syncytial (pronounced sin-SISH-uhl) Virus, or RSV for short, is a respiratory virus that infects the lungs and breathing passages. For most healthy older children and adults, it results in cold-like symptoms from which they recover in one to two weeks. However, RSV infections can be severe in some people, such as certain infants, young children, and the elderly. In fact, RSV is the most common cause of bronchiolitis (inflammation of the small airways in the lung) and pneumonia in children under 1 year of age in the United States.

There are two primary ways in which RSV is spread. First, is close contact with an infected person where the virus is breathed in from the air. Second, is by touching items that were previously handled by a sick person as the virus can live on surfaces for up to 30 hours. In an effort to help control the spread of RSV and other types of infections, Weed Army Community Hospital will be changing our toy policy.

Effective April 30, WACH will no longer maintain toys for general use in the waiting areas of clinics. Toys, however, can be very important to children as they wait on a doctor’s appointment, providing distraction in an often stressful situation. We would like to encourage all parents to bring your child’s toys with you when visiting our facility. These toys would be for individual play, which will minimize sharing of toys with other sick children and help maintain the health and wellness of our pediatric population.

We thank you in advance for your understanding of our change in policy and hope that we continue to meet the personal and collective needs of our Fort Irwin community.




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