Health & Safety

April 5, 2013

Weed Army Community Hospital Infection Prevention Program update

Post traumatic stress disorders do not automatically cause problems with alcohol use; there are many people with PTSD who do not have problems with alcohol. However, PTSD and alcohol together can be serious trouble for the trauma survivor and his or her family. Symptoms of PTSD often are worsened by alcohol use.

•Although alcohol can provide a temporary feeling of distraction and relief, it also reduces the ability to concentrate, enjoy life and be productive

• Excessive alcohol use can impair one’s ability to sleep restfully and to cope with trauma memories and stress

•Alcohol use and intoxication also increases emotional numbing, social isolation, anger and irritability, depression, and the feeling of needing to be on guard (hyper vigilance)

• Alcohol use disorders reduce the effectiveness of PTSD treatment

Many individuals with PTSD experience sleep disturbances (trouble falling asleep or problems with waking up frequently after falling asleep). When a person with PTSD experiences sleep disturbances, using alcohol as a way to self-medicate becomes a double-edged sword. Alcohol use may appear to help symptoms of PTSD because the alcohol may decrease the severity and number of frightening nightmares commonly experienced in PTSD. However, alcohol use may, on the other hand, continue the cycle of avoidance found in PTSD, making it ultimately much more difficult to treat PTSD because the client’s avoidance behavior prolongs the problems being addressed in treatment. Also, when a person withdraws from alcohol, nightmares often increase.

Individuals with a combination of PTSD and alcohol use problems often have additional mental or physical health problems. As many as 10-50 percent of adults with alcohol use disorders and PTSD also have one or more of the following serious disorders:

• Anxiety disorders (such as panic attacks, phobias, incapacitating worry, or compulsions)

• Mood disorders (such as major depression or a dysthymic disorder)

• Disruptive behavior disorders (such as attention deficit or antisocial personality disorder)

• Addictive disorders (such as addiction to or abuse of street or prescription drugs)

• Chronic physical illness (such as diabetes, heart disease, or liver disease)

• Chronic physical pain due to physical injury/illness or due to no clear physical cause

(Information for this article gathered from a fact sheet courtesy of the National Center for Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder, Department of Veterans Affairs)

 

Prevention

To help prevent the spread of RSV, people who have cold-like symptoms should:

• Cover their mouth and nose when coughing or sneezing

• Wash their hands often with soap and water for 15–20 seconds

• Avoid sharing cups and eating utensils with others

• Refrain from kissing others

Source: Centers for Disease Control and Prevention




All of this week's top headlines to your email every Friday.


 
 

 

Exchange resolves to promote healthier living

According to Sourcewire, nearly a quarter of Americans vow to get fit for the New Year. The Fort Irwin Exchange is doing its part to make it easier for Soldiers, and Families, to watch their “bottom lines” when making dining choices on and off duty. Dining in the Exchange’s Fort Irwin Food Court doesn’t have...
 
 

Avoid being a No Show

“No Shows” are missed medical appointments that may negatively impact your ability to access health care here. A No Show is defined as an appointment that is scheduled, but not cancelled or honored by the patient. A No Show is a lost opportunity to provide healthcare services to you and to another patient, who could...
 
 
CathyBellard_LVN_LeesySublett

Story Time teaches children about safety helmets

Miriam Fuentes, military spouse here, took her daughter Devannie to Story Time at the Fort Irwin library, March 12. Sergeant Steve Steiner, a health technician at Behavioral Health with MEDDAC, imitated the voices of characters...
 

 

Aiming to reduce stigma of TBI

National Brain Injury Awareness Month a time to get informed, get treatment In order for more individuals to seek treatment for traumatic brain injuries, the social stigma associated with that “invisible wound” must be reduced. That is the message Maj. Shirley Daniel, chief and program manager of the TBI/Concussive Injury Clinic at Weed Army Community...
 
 

March is National Brain Injury Aware- ness Month and Fort Irwin medical personnel will be informing the com- munity about the symptoms and dan- gers of traumatic brain injuries.

arch is National Brain Injury Aware- ness Month and Fort Irwin medical personnel will be informing the com- munity about the symptoms and dangers of traumatic brain injuries. Weekly radio broadcasts on KNTC 88.3 FM during the month, information booths in various locations, and activities with chil- dren will be held to provide the community...
 
 

Know the symptoms, dangers of brain injuries

A traumatic brain injury is a disruption of brain function resulting from a blow or jolt to the head or penetrating head injury. A TBI can occur on the battlefield, on the football field, on the playground, in a car accident, and even at home. There are four categories of TBI including mild, moderate, severe...
 




0 Comments


Be the first to comment!


Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

You may use these HTML tags and attributes: <a href="" title=""> <abbr title=""> <acronym title=""> <b> <blockquote cite=""> <cite> <code> <del datetime=""> <em> <i> <q cite=""> <strike> <strong>


Directory powered by Business Directory Plugin