Health & Safety

May 3, 2013

Healthy equal opportunity environment key in unit readiness

Sgt. 1st Class Darryl A. Avery
Equal Opportunity Advisor 11th Armored Cavalry Regiment

This country was founded on the basic values of freedom, dignity, respect, and opportunity for all. In an ongoing struggle to ensure that these rights are enjoyed by all, we must continue to educate each other on the importance of equal opportunity.

Values, attitudes and prejudices gained before enlistment or commissioning do not automatically dissolve or change when someone puts on an Army uniform. Too often these values, attitudes and prejudices can lead to the misunderstanding, frustration and suspicion of others. Knowing and accepting this will help you to understand the impact of effective EO education on command climate.

A positive, proactive EO environment helps units’ effectiveness. It promotes morale, teamwork, and results in a high degree of unit cohesion and esprit de corps. People perform most efficiently in an atmosphere free of intergroup friction and discord. Therefore, a healthy EO environment is a key factor in developing and maintaining unit readiness.

Army Regulation 600-20 (Army Command Policy) defines equal opportunity as:

“The right of all persons to participate in and benefit from programs and activities for which they are qualified. These programs and activities will be free from social, personal, or institutional barriers that prevent people from rising to the highest level of accountability possible.
Persons will be evaluated only on individual merit, fitness, capability, and potential, regardless of race, color, sex, national origin, or religion, except as prescribed by statute, or other Service policy.”

This policy:

  1. Applies both on and off post, during duty and non-duty hours.
  2. Applies to working, living, and recreational environments (including both on and off-post housing).
  3. Additionally, in some circumstances, the Equal Employment Opportunity Complaint system in AR 690–600 may provide guidance.

The Army provides EO and fair treatment for Soldiers, Family members and Civilians without regard to race, color, gender, religion, national origin, and provides an environment free of unlawful discrimination and offensive behavior.

Be on the look-out for weekly information posted about the Army’s EO and SHARP programs and initiatives specific to the NTC and Fort Irwin Community.

Questions comments or concerns pertaining to this and future articles should be directed to the 11th ACR EO Office at 380-2513 or darryl.a.avery.mil@.mail.mil.

NTC Fort Irwin Equal Opportunity Advisors:

NTC Fort Irwin Equal Employment Opportunity John Winfield: 380-4961

NTC Fort Irwin Equal Opportunity Advisor Sgt 1st Class Chad Breit: 380-4963

11th ACR EOA – Sgt 1st Class Darryl Avery: 380-2513

916th Sustainment Brigade EOA – Sgt 1st Class Octavius Jackson: 380-3087




All of this week's top headlines to your email every Friday.


 
 

 

Exchange resolves to promote healthier living

According to Sourcewire, nearly a quarter of Americans vow to get fit for the New Year. The Fort Irwin Exchange is doing its part to make it easier for Soldiers, and Families, to watch their “bottom lines” when making dining choices on and off duty. Dining in the Exchange’s Fort Irwin Food Court doesn’t have...
 
 

Avoid being a No Show

“No Shows” are missed medical appointments that may negatively impact your ability to access health care here. A No Show is defined as an appointment that is scheduled, but not cancelled or honored by the patient. A No Show is a lost opportunity to provide healthcare services to you and to another patient, who could...
 
 
CathyBellard_LVN_LeesySublett

Story Time teaches children about safety helmets

Miriam Fuentes, military spouse here, took her daughter Devannie to Story Time at the Fort Irwin library, March 12. Sergeant Steve Steiner, a health technician at Behavioral Health with MEDDAC, imitated the voices of characters...
 

 

Aiming to reduce stigma of TBI

National Brain Injury Awareness Month a time to get informed, get treatment In order for more individuals to seek treatment for traumatic brain injuries, the social stigma associated with that “invisible wound” must be reduced. That is the message Maj. Shirley Daniel, chief and program manager of the TBI/Concussive Injury Clinic at Weed Army Community...
 
 

March is National Brain Injury Aware- ness Month and Fort Irwin medical personnel will be informing the com- munity about the symptoms and dan- gers of traumatic brain injuries.

arch is National Brain Injury Aware- ness Month and Fort Irwin medical personnel will be informing the com- munity about the symptoms and dangers of traumatic brain injuries. Weekly radio broadcasts on KNTC 88.3 FM during the month, information booths in various locations, and activities with chil- dren will be held to provide the community...
 
 

Know the symptoms, dangers of brain injuries

A traumatic brain injury is a disruption of brain function resulting from a blow or jolt to the head or penetrating head injury. A TBI can occur on the battlefield, on the football field, on the playground, in a car accident, and even at home. There are four categories of TBI including mild, moderate, severe...
 




0 Comments


Be the first to comment!


Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

You may use these HTML tags and attributes: <a href="" title=""> <abbr title=""> <acronym title=""> <b> <blockquote cite=""> <cite> <code> <del datetime=""> <em> <i> <q cite=""> <strike> <strong>


Directory powered by Business Directory Plugin