Health & Safety

September 6, 2013

Is your family prepared for an emergency? The Ready Army program can help

Ready Army is the Army’s proactive campaign to increase the resilience of the Army community and enhance the readiness of the force by informing Soldiers, their Families, Army Civilians and contractors of relevant hazards and encouraging them to “Be Informed, Make A Plan, Build a Kit and Get Involved.”

Through outreach and education, Ready Army calls our Army community to action and aims to create a culture of preparedness that will save lives and strengthen the nation.

Preparing for emergencies brings peace of mind. And it could keep an emergency from becoming a disaster for you and your family.

Prepare Strong! Take these three steps to get started:

Get a Kit

Get an emergency kit that includes enough supplies to meet your Family’s essential needs for at least three days. Consider the basics of survival and the unique needs of your Family including pets. You may want to assemble emergency supply kits in your home, car and workplace. Your emergency kits must include water, food, first aid supplies, medicines and important documents.

Make a Plan

Make and practice your Family emergency plan, considering communication methods and emergency actions. You and your Family members may not be together when an emergency strikes. Planning ahead for various emergencies will improve your chances of keeping in touch, staying safe and quickly reuniting. Make sure everyone understands what to do, where to go and what to take in the event of an emergency.

Be Informed

Identify all hazards that can affect you and your Family. Emergencies can arise from weather and other natural hazards, industrial and transportation accidents, disease epidemics and terrorist acts. Anticipate the emergencies most likely to affect you and your Family in your geographical location. Knowing what to do can make all the difference when seconds count.

For more information and children’s resources on the campaign go to www.acsim.army.mil/readyarmy/.




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