Local

April 4, 2014

Fort Irwin homeschool students learn about Native American Indian culture, insects, tortoises

Children partake in a coloring activity at the Environmental Center for Directorate of Public Works at Fort Irwin, March 14. The students, who are homeschooled, were on a monthly trip for children of the homeschooled community of this installation.

Living or working on Fort Irwin puts its community well into the desert, but it also provides a great opportunity to learn about the unique environment of the Mojave.

Being good stewards of the land, the United States Army at the National Training Center and Fort Irwin employs experts in the fields of archaeology and biology. Those experts perform a mission to inform Soldiers and Families of the wonders and dangers of animals and plants, and about past inhabitants of the area. A group of students took advantage of that expertise during an outing to the Environmental Center of Directorate of Public Works here, March 14.

Approximately 40 homeschooled students, elementary to high school, attended the open house, said Stacey Baquera, military spouse and head of the homeschool community. Groups of students rotated through six stations displaying insects, snakes, tortoises and demonstrations of skill used by Native American Indians in the past. At the anthropology station, archaeologist Matthew Yacubic showed students how past indigenous people worked stone and obsidian to make tools and hunting gear. He also allowed students to use a metate (grinding stone) to crush seeds.

Dakota Taylor,15 and in the 10th grade, holds a replica weapon handed to him by Matthew Yacubic, archeologist with Directorate of Public Works here. The weapon would have been used by Native American Indians who lived in the Fort Irwin area.

April Billingsley, a military spouse here, attended with: son, Josiah 3; nieces Jordan, 13, and Ariona, 8, and ; nephew Gary, 7. She provides homeschool instruction to the four and said the trip for them was really great.

Jordan called the exhibits “cool” and enjoyed leaning about the Mojave ground squirrel and snakes.

At the desert tortoise exhibit, lead biologist Liana Aker explained to the youth that the threatened species can live many years, such as Dozer, who is 50 years old and is one of three tortoises that reside in pens outside the facility. She explained that sightings of tortoises at the NTC and Fort Irwin are reported to the department of Fish and Wildlife.

Baquera praised the DPW experts as very knowledgeable and called the opportunity to visit their facility as awesome. She stated that the homeschool group goes on a trip about once a month. Previous outings have been to a train museum and Harvey House in Barstow and the Shark Reef Aquarium in Las Vegas. Future trips include the Riley Farms in Oak Glen for Civil War reenactments and Sea World in San Diego.
 

Students participate in an activity demonstrating tools and techniques used in archeology. The students are from a group that receives homeschool instruction while living on Fort Irwin.

 

An insect display was one of six stations at the Environmental Center at Fort Irwin that students visited, March 14.

 




All of this week's top headlines to your email every Friday.


 
 

 
Gustavo Bahena

Flying Tigers activated

Gustavo Bahena The 2916th Aviation Battalion commander, Lt. Col. William Garber (right), hands a guidon to Capt. Jesse DeJaynes during a unit activation ceremony here, Oct. 16. DeJaynes leads the newly activated unit – B ...
 
 

Celebrating pride, spirit

From the Aleutian Islands to the Florida everglades, American Indians and Alaska Natives have contributed immensely to our country’s heritage. They have enhanced our nation through contributions in the fields of art, science, education, business and our military. Native Americans have bravely served and participated with distinction in U.S. military actions for more than 200...
 
 

Honoring cultural differences

National Hispanic Heritage Month, a celebration of the contributions and accomplishments of America’s Hispanic community, is celebrated from Sept. 15 to Oct. 15. In recognition of this year’s celebration, Weed Army Community Hospital and the National Training Center’s EO/EEO Office hosted “Hispanics, A Legacy of History, A Present of Action and a Future of Success,”...
 

 

Soldier, leader, Veteran

The Veterans Day observance provides the country an opportunity to recognize the contributions of past and current servicemembers, but it also gives Soldiers a chance to reflect on experiences and people who have impacted a career in defense of the United States of America. Deployment experiences, friends and family have been a huge influence in...
 
 

Sustainability involves repairs, latest technology, planning for future

The Directorate of Public Works here strives to keep this post, not only operational, but modern for personnel to conduct the mission of the National Training Center. In the past two fiscal years, DPW has been involved with numerous projects that continue the sustainability and upgrading of the installation, said DPW Director Mohammed Bari. Installation...
 
 
Photo courtesy of Lelan Daines

Ten-Miler team places fourth in division

Photo courtesy of Lelan Daines Fort Irwin Soldiers took fourth in their division at the 30th Army Ten-Miler road-race near Washington D.C., Oct. 11. A team of eight Soldiers placed fourth in a mix (male and female) division whi...
 




0 Comments


Be the first to comment!


Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

You may use these HTML tags and attributes: <a href="" title=""> <abbr title=""> <acronym title=""> <b> <blockquote cite=""> <cite> <code> <del datetime=""> <em> <i> <q cite=""> <strike> <strong>


Directory powered by Business Directory Plugin