Health & Safety

July 3, 2014

Be aware of heat injury signs

Dave Key,
Safety Director NTC and Fort Irwin

Heat is the number one weather-related killer in the United States. On average, excessive heat claims more lives each year than floods, lightning, tornadoes and hurricanes combined.

During extremely hot weather the body’s ability to cool itself is affected. This happens when the body heats too rapidly to cool itself properly, or when too much fluid or salt is lost through dehydration or sweating.

Children, adults and pets enclosed in parked vehicles are at great risk

In 2013, 43 children in the U.S. and an untold numbers of pets died from hyperthermia, because they were left inside a vehicle. Hyperthermia is an acute condition that occurs when the body absorbs more heat than it can handle. Hyperthermia can occur even on a mild day. Studies have shown that the temperature inside a parked vehicle can rapidly rise to a dangerous level for children, pets and even adults. If you see a child unattended in a vehicle, call 911.

Leaving car windows slightly open does not significantly decrease the heating rate. The effects can be more severe on children, because their bodies warm at a faster rate than adults. A dark dashboard or seat can reach temperatures of 180 degrees Fahrenheit to more than 200.

Make sure your child’s safety seat and safety belt buckles aren’t too hot before securing your child.

Hazards of excessive heat

As the heat index rises above 103 degrees there is a high risk for heat-related illness. Heat kills by pushing the human body beyond its limits. Under normal conditions, perspiration evaporates and cools the body. However, in extreme heat the body must work extra hard to maintain a normal temperature.

Conditions that cause heat cramps in a 17-year-old may result in heat exhaustion in someone 40 and heat stroke in a person over 60.

Sunburn can significantly retard the skin’s ability to shed excess heat.

Heat-related illness can be caused by overexposure to the sun or any situation involving extreme heat. Heat stroke is the most serious and life-threatening condition, and can occur by ignoring the signals of heat exhaustion. Heat stroke develops when body systems are overwhelmed by heat and begin to stop functioning. Symptoms include: flushed, hot, dry skin; fainting; a rapid, weak pulse; rapid, shallow breathing; vomiting, and; increased body temperature of more than 104 degrees. Body temperature may rise to 106 or higher within 10 to 15 minutes. Heat stroke can cause death or permanent disability if emergency treatment is not provided. Move an injured person into the shade, loosen clothing, wet and fan the skin, and place ice-packs in the armpits and on the neck. Take the injured person to a clinic or emergency room if signs or symptoms worsen or do not improve within 60 minutes.




All of this week's top headlines to your email every Friday.


 
 

 
Leslie Ozawa

New commander for U.S. Army Garrison Fort Irwin

Leslie Ozawa United States Army Garrison Fort Irwin Commander Col. G. Scott Taylor (left) receives a guidon from Thomas Schoenbeck, director of Central Region for Installation Management Command, during a change of command cere...
 
 
Tarah_and_EricHipple

Army observes Suicide Awareness Month in September

Fort Irwin to host motivational speakers In support of the nation’s observance of Suicide Prevention Week, Sept. 7 -13, and World Suicide Prevention Day, Sept. 10, the United States Army focuses on a campaign about the import...
 
 
Photo courtesy of VVTA

Your bus ride just got better

Photo courtesy of VVTA The Victor Valley Transit Authority has acquired five new “luxury coaches” which will be used on the commuter routes between Hesperia, Victorville, Silver Lakes, Barstow and Fort Irwin in mid-August. ...
 

 
11th ACR

Bringing connectivity to GCSS-A in the field

11th ACR Staff Sgt. Don Nottingham from Maintenance Troop, Regimental Support Squadron, 11th Armored Cavalry sets up the Very Small Aperture Terminal here, March 17. During a field training exercise March 16 to 18, here, Mainte...
 
 
Jason Miller

Commissary awards scholarship

Jason Miller From left: Stephen MacAfee, S & K Sales associate; Qahir Abdur-Rahman, Fort Irwin Commissary store director; Alex Nguyen, scholarship recipient; Michele Nguyen, Alex’s mom and; Command Sgt. Maj. Jerry Nguyen...
 
 

Get a refund for gasoline taxes

The California gasoline tax refund could save you hundreds of dollars every year. In order to maintain California’s many highways, the state taxes every gallon of fuel that you put into your car (even gas purchased on post). This is reasonable, because we all know what it is like to drive on poorly maintained roads,...
 




0 Comments


Be the first to comment!


Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

You may use these HTML tags and attributes: <a href="" title=""> <abbr title=""> <acronym title=""> <b> <blockquote cite=""> <cite> <code> <del datetime=""> <em> <i> <q cite=""> <s> <strike> <strong>