February 5, 2016

Fort Irwin supports Rose Bowl game

Public Affairs Office
The National Training Center and Fort Irwin organized and led the joint color guard for the 102nd Rose Bowl Game, Jan. 1.

A joint service military color guard and the commander of this installation supported the Rose Bowl college football game, Jan. 1.

The color guard consisted of eight servicemembers from the Air Force, Coast Guard, Marines, Navy and Army with a senior non-commissioned officer-in-charge. The detail presented the services’ flags and the colors of the nation prior to the game between the Stanford University Cardinals and the University of Iowa Hawkeyes.

National Training Center and Fort Irwin Commander Maj. Gen. Joseph Martin also supported the event as a senior active duty Army commander.

The game was attended by approximately 95,000 people and televised nationally. It was the 102nd Rose Bowl game and featured the highest ranking teams from the Pac-12 Conference and Big Ten Conference that were not selected to play in a college football playoff semifinal game.

The Cardinals crushed Iowa, 45 to 16.

All of this week's top headlines to your email every Friday.


Army photograph

Budget flexibility, Congress’ support can help Army modernize

Army photograph Secretary of the Army Dr. Mark T. Esper meets with U.S. Army Soldiers in the field. Esper spoke at the Center for Strategic and International Studies in Washington, D.C., March 12, 2018, for a public discussion ...
Army photograph by Spec. Andrew McNeil

Lighter, faster, smaller equipment needed for Soldiers to win, says Gen. Townsend

Army photograph by Spec. Andrew McNeil U.S. Soldiers assigned to Lightning Troop, 3rd Squadron, 2nd Cavalry Regiment, move from one position to another while pulling security during Command Post Exercise Weasel near the Bemowo ...
Army photograph by Sean Kimmons

Army developing system to allow Soldiers to see buried bombs for route clearance

The Army is developing technology that visually alerts Soldiers to hidden explosives in the ground rather than just providing them an audible notification during use of mine detector equipment. Called real-time spatial location...