Army

March 27, 2017
 

Army offering 2-year enlistments for 91 MOSs

David Vergun
Army News

Army recruits in basic training deliver a call shortly after running an obstacle course on Fort Benning, Ga., May 4, 2012. The Army is allowing two-year enlistments for select military occupational specialties.

The Army now has two-year enlistment options for 91 military occupational specialties as a new incentive to offer prospects interested in joining its ranks.

The traditional options for enlisting for three, four, five and six years remain in place, according to Brian Sutton, a U.S. Army Recruiting Command spokesman.

Soldiers who opt for the two-year plan and are found eligible will do two years of active duty, followed by two years in the Reserve and then four years in the Inactive Ready Reserve, he said.

Maj. Gen. Jeffrey Snow, commander of USAREC, said:
“We believe this shorter enlistment opportunity will appeal to young men and women who want to take some time off between high school and college. It allows us to demonstrate to them in a short period of time that the Army is about much more than a job. It’s about experience, education and leadership.”

Snow added: “From a different perspective, shorter enlistments allow us to put more veterans back into society, which we see as a positive. The veteran population is shrinking, which is a problem for us because veterans play a key role in telling the Army story and encouraging young people to consider service.”




All of this week's top headlines to your email every Friday.


 
 

 
Army photo

Army testing more effective ghillie suits

FORT BELVOIR, Va­ — The Army is looking for an improved ghillie suit to replace the flame-resistant, camouflage suit now worn by snipers to keep them from being seen by the enemy. The current ghillie suits are bulky, somewha...
 
 
Army photograph by Pfc. Zoe Garbarino

Mattis: More data needed to assess women’s effectiveness in combat arms

With so few women in combat arms right now, the services and Defense Department officials really can’t judge how successful the effort has been, Defense Secretary James N. Mattis told cadets at the Virginia Military Institute...
 
 
Army photograph by Sgt. David Edge

Modernizing the Army’s OPFOR program to become a near-peer sparring partner

Army photograph by Sgt. David Edge U.S. Army Soldiers, posing as an Opposing Force, operate OPFOR Surrogate Vehicles and Main Battle Tanks at the National Training Center, May 2, 2017. While the United States fought conflicts a...