On This Date

0
536
(Courtesy photo)
Advertisement

Sept. 25, 1950: NACA test pilot John Griffith made the first NACA flight of the X-4 research aircraft.
 
 
 
 
 
 

(Courtesy photo)

Sept. 25, 1974: Northrop’s F-5F made its first flight, piloted by Hank Chouteau. The F-5F was a two-seat trainer version of the company’s F-35E Tiger II, and featured a completely new fuselage.
 
 
 
 
 
 
(Courtesy photo)

Sept. 25, 1992: NASA’s Mars Observer blasted off on a $980 million mission to the red planet (the probe disappeared just before entering Martian orbit in August 1993).
 
 
 
 
 
 
(Courtesy photo)

Sept. 26, 1929: The second known “first flight” of an aircraft from Rogers Dry Lake took place. Jack Northrop trucked his first experimental flying wing-type aircraft, the X-216H, to Muroc Dry Lake, where Eddie Bellande took it on its first two official flights. The single-engine pusher proved to be 25 percent faster than equivalent conventional designs. In the photograph Bellande is on the left and Northrop is on the right.
 
 
 
 
 
 
(Courtesy photo)

Sept. 26, 1942: The reassembled Bell XP-59A Airacomet rolled out of its hangar and its engines were started for the first time.
 
 
 
 
 
 
(Courtesy photo)

Sept. 27, 1956: Test pilot Capt. Milburn “Mel” Apt lost his life during a flight test mission. Apt was making his first flight in the Bell X-2 and flew it to an unofficial record speed of Mach 3.196, thus becoming the first person to exceed Mach 3. It is reported that during an attempt to turn the aircraft back to Edwards, it began to oscillate in all axes and departed controlled flight. Apt’s last radio transmission was, “There she goes,” before he fell in unconsciousness two times. His effort to parachute from the escape capsule failed and he was killed instantly when the X-2 hit the desert floor.
 
 
 
 
 
 
(Courtesy photo)

Sept. 27, 1991: A dedication ceremony was held for the Blackbird Airpark in Palmdale, Calf. The Airpark is an annex of the Air Force Flight Test Museum and is located on East 25th Street at Rancho Vista Parkway in Palmdale. Today the airpark has the world’s only display of a Lockheed SR-71A together with its Blackbird predecessor the first A-12, along with the once ultra-secret D-21 drone and the only remaining U-2 “D” model in the world plus other exhibits.
 
 
 
 
 
 
(Courtesy photo)

Sept. 28, 1972: The Air Force Flight Test Center at Edwards Air Force Base, Calif., completed the first Air Force preliminary evaluation of the flying qualities of the McDonnell Douglas F-15A.
 
 
 
 
 
 
(Courtesy photo)

Sept. 29, 1954: McDonnell’s twin-engine jet fighter, the F-101A Voodoo, made its first flight. Robert C. “Bob” Little took the interceptor to Mach 1.2 in level flight. The F-101 was an enormously successful follow-on to an earlier McDonnell design – the XF-88.
 
 
 
 
 
 
(Courtesy photo)

Sept. 29, 1990: The Lockheed YF-22A made its first flown by Lockheed chief test pilot Dave Ferguson. Designed and built by Lockheed, Boeing and General Dynamics, the new fighter subsequently beat the YF-23A in the ATF competition and was ordered into production.
 
 
 
 
 
 
(Courtesy photo)

Sept. 29, 2004: The Air Force Flight Test Center at Edwards Air Force Base, Calif., provided range support to Scaled Composites, Inc. successful flight of its SpaceShipOne air vehicle originating from the Mojave Air & Space Port. AFFTC’s support consisted of radar tracking, weather service, a ground station, and a communications loop.
 
 
 
 
 
 
(Courtesy photo)

Sept. 30, 1976: B-1 Phase I testing was completed after 64 sorties and 342.9 flight hours. While it was a combined DT&E and OT&E effort, the primary objective was to generate data for the production of the new bomber.
 
 
 
 
 
 
(Courtesy photo)

Oct. 2, 1941: Bell Chief Test Pilot Bob Stanley took the XP-59A Airacomet on its “official” first flight, climbing to 6,000 feet after an unusually long takeoff roll. Col. Laurence C. “Bill” Craigie, chief of the Experimental Aircraft Section at Wright Field, Ohio, then flew the airplane, becoming the nation’s first military jet pilot…..
and then:
Oct. 1, 1942: During high-speed taxi tests by Bell test pilot Bob Stanley (left), the Bell XP-59A lifted about 100 feet of the lakebed. Larry Bell delayed the first flight until the arrival of high-ranking official observers.
 
 
 
 
 
 
(Courtesy photo)

Oct. 1, 1947: North American’s XP-86 made its first flight, flown by North American test pilot George “Wheaties” Welch. The single-engine fighter was the nation’s first swept-wing combat airplane. The design of the XP-86, later to become famous as the F-86 Sabre, was derived from the company’s pudgy, straight-winged FJ-1 Fury fighter for the U.S. Navy.
 
 
 
 
 
 
(Courtesy photo)

Oct. 1, 1957: The first flight was flown in a series of Low Altitude Bombing System (LABS) suitability tests for the Douglas B-66B. The purpose was to evaluate the suitability of the twin engine light bomber to the high stresses involved in the toss-bomb maneuver.
 
 
 
 
 
 
(Courtesy photo)

Oct. 1, 2008: The first F-35 test aircraft, AA-1, arrived at Edwards Air Force Base, Calif., following the model’s first cross-country flight from the Lockheed Martin Aeronautics production facility in Fort Worth, Texas. The aircraft was scheduled to remain several weeks at Edwards to conduct flight tests, before returning to Texas.
 
 
 
 
 
 
(Courtesy photo)

Oct. 2, 1946: The Chance Vought Company’s XF6U-1 Pirate made its first flight, piloted by “Ted” Owens. The aircraft was a single-engine, straight-winged Navy fighter constructed with an experimental Metalite (laminated aluminum and balsa sheet) skin.
 
 
 
 
 
 
(Courtesy photo)

Oct. 2, 1969: The first C-5A Galaxy arrived at Edwards Air Force Base, Calif., for Category II testing.
 
 
 
 
 
 
(Courtesy photo)

(Courtesy photo)

Oct. 3, 1967: Maj. William J. “Pete” Knight flew the modified X-15A-2 to a speed of Mach 6.7 (4,520 mph). The aircraft was flown with its full ablative coating and external fuel tanks. A dummy ramjet mounted on the lower ventral stub stabilizer fell away during the flight as a result of severe heat damage to the fairing. The flight marked the highest speed achieved in the X-15 program and remains the highest speed ever reached by a manned airplane.
 
 
 
 
 
 
(Courtesy photo)

Oct. 4, 1968: Category II Performance and Stability and Control evaluations began on the A-37B light attack aircraft at Edwards Air Force Base, Calif.
 
 
 

Get Breaking Aerospace News Sent To Your Inbox! We Never Spam


By submitting this form, you are consenting to receive marketing emails from: Aerotech News and Review, 220 E. Ave. K-4, Lancaster, CA, 93535, http://www.aerotechnews.com. You can revoke your consent to receive emails at any time by using the SafeUnsubscribe® link, found at the bottom of every email. Emails are serviced by Constant Contact

Advertisement