Red Flag to the Rescue

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Simulated isolated personnel wait on recovery during an exercise in Southern Arizona as part of Red Flag-Rescue 19-2 on Aug. 21, 2019. Red Flag-Rescue is the Department of Defense’s premier combat search and rescue exercise providing realistic combat search and rescue training in contested, degraded and operationally limited environments. (Air Force photograph by Airman 1st Class Jacob T. Stephens)

The Carrier Air Wing Nine Unit from Naval Air Station North Island, Calif., flew their MH-60S Seahawks as part of Red Flag-Rescue 19-2 at Davis-Monthan Air Force Base, Ariz., Aug. 17, 2019.

For nearly three weeks, Airmen teamed up with Sailors, Marines and Soldiers to execute the Department of Defense’s premier combat search and rescue exercise.

“Interoperability can be difficult while doing interservice operations,” said U.S. Navy Lt. Cmdr. Jonny Kane, Officer in Charge of HSC-14 for Red Flag-Rescue 19-2. “Working with fixed wing aircraft, helicopters and ground operators there are always challenges that rely on communications in the aircraft. It [Red Flag-Rescue] certainly presented a realistic challenge of scenarios we would have.”

A U.S. Navy MH-60S Seahawk picks up simulated isolated personnel in Southern Arizona as part of Red Flag-Rescue 19-2 on Aug. 21, 2019. The MH-60S Seahawk pilots were able to experience live fire exercises, as well as executing refueling drills and simulated combat search and rescue drops. (Air Force photograph by Airman 1st Class Jacob T. Stephens)

The MH-60S Seahawk pilots were able to experience live fire, as well as executing refueling drills and simulated combat search and rescue drops.

“Coming back from a nearly year-long deployment, getting to train over land in a very realistic opposing force presentation with real players, live fire and non-live fire is training that is second to none,” Kane said.

Red Flag-Rescue gives U.S. aircrews the opportunity to complete their first 10 combat sorties, the realistic training helps prepare to face and defeat any potential adversaries.

This joint service exercise contributes to the readiness of the entire DoD force. The training accomplished ensures that the Air Force and its sister branches continue to develop into a faster, smarter and more lethal force.
 

A U.S. Air Force Forward Area Refueling Point operator finishes refueling a U.S. Navy MH-60S Seahawk during a training exercise in Southern Arizona that was involved in Red Flag-Rescue 19-2 on Aug. 21, 2019. FARP operators effectively refuel aircraft in remote locations when air-to-air refueling is not possible or when fueling stations are not accessible. (Air Force photograph by Airman 1st Class Jacob T. Stephens)

 
A U.S. Navy MH-60S Seahawk flies over Southern Arizona during a training exercise involved in Red Flag-Rescue 19-2 on Aug. 21, 2019. Red Flag-Rescue gives aircrews from across the Department of Defense the opportunity to complete their first 10 combat sorties. (Air Force photograph by Airman 1st Class Jacob T. Stephens)

 
A U.S. Navy sailor looks out the side of an MH-60S Seahawk over Southern Arizona during Red Flag-Rescue 19-2 on Aug. 21, 2019. Davis-Monthan Air Force Base Airmen teamed up with Sailors, Marines and Soldiers for nearly three weeks to execute the Department of Defense’s premier search and rescue exercise ensuring the DoD continues to develop into a faster, smarter and more lethal force. (Air Force photograph by Airman 1st Class Jacob T. Stephens)