Brrreaking it down, building it up

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Airman 1st Class Milazzo Damiano, 355th Equipment Maintenance Squadron A-10 Thunderbolt II crew chief, works on the wing of an A-10 at Davis-Monthan Air Force Base, Ariz., Nov. 5, 2019. Airmen assigned to the 355th EMS A-10 Phase Section are tasked to perform detailed inspections to ensure A-10s uphold war-ready status. (Air Force photograph by Airman 1st Class Jacob T. Stephens)

As the global climate of war continues to evolve so do the requirements of Airmen to rapidly wield combat power.

Airmen from the 355th Equipment Maintenance Squadron continue to adapt to the needs of the four combatant commanders that Davis-Monthan Air Force Base, Ariz., supports daily.

Airmen with the 355th EMS A-10 Thunderbolt II phasing section began working 12-hour shifts in support of exercise Bushwhacker 19-08 to turn their phasing process in half from 10 days to five. 

Senior Airman Arron Canady-Post, 355th Equipment Maintenance Squadron A-10 Thunderbolt II crew chief, works on the wing of an A-10 at Davis-Monthan Air Force Base, Ariz., Nov. 5, 2019. (Air Force photograph by Airman 1st Class Jacob T. Stephens)

“We cut our process time in half which ensures that downrange we can still get done what we need to and execute the mission,” said U.S. Air Force Senior Airman Arron Canady-Post, 355th EMS A-10 crew chief.

The regular processes of tearing apart, inspecting, fixing and putting the A-10 back together does not change, however.

“The work is really the same,” said Airman 1st Class John Wingate, 355th EMS A-10 crew chief. “We’re just working longer shifts so we can get more done in a shorter amount of time.”

Staff Sgt. Nathan Nash, 355th Equipment Maintenance Squadron A-10 Thunderbolt II electrical and environmental technician, works on the engine of an A-10 at Davis-Monthan Air Force Base, Ariz., Nov. 5, 2019. (Air Force photograph by Airman 1st Class Jacob T. Stephens)

Moving from traditional to combat phasing helps these maintainers prepare for anything that they could face downrange and support the mission of the wing.

“This change allows us to put the same reliable aircraft up in a shorter amount of time so the wing can keep airpower up in the skies,” said Canady-Post. “This shows that our aircraft, as well as its maintainers, are more than ready for anything that can be thrown our way.”

The Airmen of Davis-Monthan are learning their role in the joint fight as the wing continues to build a more lethal and rapidly ready force that leads the Air Force in operational readiness
 

A U.S. Air Force A-10 Thunderbolt II sits in the 355th Equipment Maintenance Squadron hangar at Davis-Monthan Air Force Base, Ariz., Nov. 5, 2019. (Air Force photograph by Airman 1st Class Jacob T. Stephens)

 
Staff Sgt. Joseph Young, 355th Equipment Maintenance Squadron A-10 Thunderbolt II crew chief, inspects the wing of an A-10 at Davis-Monthan Air Force Base, Ariz., Nov. 5, 2019. (Air Force photograph by Airman 1st Class Jacob T. Stephens)

 
Senior Airman Xenquayen Flemings, 355th Equipment Maintenance Squadron A-10 Thunderbolt II weapons technician, works on the wing of an A-10 at Davis-Monthan Air Force Base, Ariz., Nov. 5, 2019. (Air Force photograph by Airman 1st Class Jacob T. Stephens)

 
Airman 1st Class Deaton Joslyn, 355th Equipment Maintenance Squadron A-10 Thunderbolt II crew chief, works on the tail of an A-10 at Davis-Monthan Air Force Base, Ariz., Nov. 5, 2019. (Air Force photograph by Airman 1st Class Jacob T. Stephens)