DM Pararescuemen receive high military distinction

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Two Bronze Stars with valor sit on a table at Davis-Monthan Air Force Base, Ariz., Oct. 1, 2020. U.S. Air Force Master Sgt. Adam and Staff Sgt. Benjamin, 48th Rescue Squadron pararescuemen, were presented Bronze Stars with valor for their actions while deployed. (Air Force photograph by Senior Airman Jacob T. Stephens)
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Master Sgt. Adam and Staff Sgt. Benjamin, 48th Rescue Squadron pararescuemen, were presented a Bronze Star with valor at Davis-Monthan Air Force Base, Arizona, Oct. 1, 2020.

Adam and Benjamin were presented these decorations, the fourth highest military honor, in recognition of their heroic actions while deployed and engaged in combat action with opposition forces.

Maj. Gen. Barry Cornish, 12th Air Force commander, returns Staff Sgt. Benjaminís, 48th Rescue Squadron pararescueman, salute during a Bronze Star presentation ceremony at Davis-Monthan Air Force Base, Ariz., Oct. 1, 2020. Benjamin was presented the Bronze Star Medal with valor for his actions while deployed. (Air Force photograph by Senior Airman Jacob T. Stephens)

“I was attached to a U.S. Army Special Forces Operational Detachment as a medic on one of their assault teams,” said Benjamin. “We were clearing a Taliban compound and one of our partner force commandos was shot clearing a compound. My team leader quickly led the assault as we eliminated the enemy with small arms fire and hand grenades at room distance. I treated multiple casualties with advanced medical interventions and helped coordinate exfiltration while my team continued to eliminate the threat.”

Adam was also recognized for executing a different rescue that ended with the same result: saved lives.

“I was attached to a Special Forces Team and while we were moving to a compound to take out an improvised explosive device manufacturer, we took a heavy IED attack, as well as small arms fire,” said Adam. “Previous training like the Combat Team Leader Course and our spin up at Razor’s Edge with Red Team helped because I knew what I was capable of. I knew what I was physically able to do, I knew I could treat that guy under fire in the dark and training with other rotary wing platforms gave me the confidence to call in a clear nine line quickly.”

These Airmen work under the motto ‘that others may live’ and they both relied on training they had received as they put themselves in danger to save the lives of multiple wounded coalition personnel.

“It is an honor to be recognized, however, the experience and brotherhood created with my team overseas is the most valuable piece for me,” said Benjamin. “The Air Force best utilizes its special warfare assets when putting them to work in the joint environment and I am proud to be a part of that.”

The rescue mission is an inherently dangerous mission, but one that is required by coalition forces worldwide. These Airmen are constantly training to maintain their state of high-end readiness so when it’s time to answer the call, they are prepared to execute while in harm’s way so that others may live.

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