DM hosts mental health first aid course

A first sergeant from the Oklahoma Air National Guard hosted a Mental Health First-Aid class to certify Airmen as mental health first-aiders at Davis-Monthan Air Force Base, Ariz., June 21-24, 2022.

Master Sgt. Timothy Cotterall, 137th Special Operations Security Forces Squadron first sergeant, travelled to DM to train the Airmen of the 924th Aircraft Maintenance Squadron and DM’s first sergeants to certify them to be able to recognize early warning signs of mental health issues.

“Mental health first-aid is an early intervention public education program,” said Cotterall. “It teaches Airmen how to recognize the signs and symptoms that suggest a potential mental health challenge, how to listen non-judgmentally and give reassurance to a person who may be experiencing a mental health challenge, and how to refer a person to appropriate professional support and services.”

Air Force photograph by Airman 1st Class William Turnbull
Master Sgt. Brock Knobloch, 418th Test and Evaluation first sergeant, reads a passage from a course book for the Mental Health First Aid course at Davis-Monthan Air Force Base, Ariz., June 23, 2022. The Mental Health First Aid course ensures that the Airmen and first sergeants are able to assist in solving a mental health crisis to combat a rise of mental health issues within the U.S. Air Force.

The course is not designed to replace professional help, but to equip Airmen with the tools needed to spot early warning signs of declining mental health and empower their wingmen to seek professional help.

Overall, 47 participants were trained this week and everyone is now certified as a Mental Health First Aiders through the National Council of Behavioral Health.

Air Force photograph by Airman 1st Class William Turnbull
Master Sgt. Brock Knobloch, 418th Test and Evaluation first sergeant, reads a passage from a course book for the Mental Health First Aid course at Davis-Monthan Air Force Base, Ariz., June 23, 2022. The Mental Health First Aid course ensures that the Airmen and first sergeants are able to assist in solving a mental health crisis to combat a rise of mental health issues within the U.S. Air Force.

Participants were taught the acronym ALGEE; Assess for risk of suicide or harm, Listen non-judgmentally, Give reassurance and information, Encourage appropriate professional help, Encourage self-help and other support strategies.

“Through this training we can raise awareness Air Force wide and better equip Airmen to recognize someone experiencing a mental health crisis.” said Senior Master Sgt. Erica Dubuque, 924th AMXS first sergeant.

More Stories