Prevent domestic violence in your community

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A key strategy in preventing domestic violence is the promotion of respectful, nonviolent relationships through individual, relationship, community, and societal level change. October is Domestic Violence Awareness Month; enhance prevention efforts in your community.

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) is committed to ensuring that all Americans, especially those at risk for intimate partner violence, live to their fullest potential. Promoting respectful, nonviolent intimate partner relationships through individual, relationship, community, and societal level change is a key strategy.

What Is Intimate Partner Violence?

Intimate partner violence includes physical violence, sexual violence, threats of physical or sexual violence, and emotional abuse by a current or former spouse or non-marital partner. This type of violence can occur among heterosexual or same-sex couples and does not require sexual intimacy. It exists along a continuum from a single episode of violence to ongoing battering.

Why Is Intimate Partner Violence a Public Health Problem?

Data from CDC’s National Intimate Partner and Sexual Violence Survey (NISVS) indicate the following:

  • An estimated 9% of women and 1% of men experienced attempted or completed rape by an intimate partner during their lifetime.
  • Severe physical violence was experienced by an estimated 22% of women and 14% of men. This includes being hit with something hard, being kicked or beaten, or being burned.
  • An estimated 9% of women and 2% of men were stalked by an intimate partner during their lifetime.