Veterans

April 6, 2018
 

Medal of Honor recipient laid to rest at Arlington

PO2 Destiny Cheek
Washington, D.C.

Sailors assigned to the U.S. Navy Ceremonial Guard fold the national ensign during the funeral for Capt. Thomas J. Hudner Jr. at Arlington National Cemetery. Hudner was awarded the Medal of Honor for his actions in trying to save the life of his wingman during the Battle of Chosin Reservoir during the Korean War.

A naval aviator who earned the Medal of Honor during the Korean War was laid to rest with full military honors at Arlington National Cemetery (ANC), April 4, 2018.

Family and friends of Capt. Thomas J. Hudner, Jr., as well as a number of service members attended the ceremony which began at the Old Post Chapel on Joint Base Myer-Henderson Hall, in Arlington, Va.

Rear Adm. William Galinis, Program Executive Officer, Ships presented the flag that draped Hudner’s casket to his wife, Georgea Hudner. Also in attendance was Chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff Gen. Joseph Dunford, Chief of Naval Operations (CNO) Adm. John Richardson, Rear Adm. Samuel Cox, (Ret.), Director, Naval History and Heritage Command, and Cmdr. Nathan Scherry, Commanding Officer, Pre-Commissioning Unit (PCU) Thomas Hudner (DDG 116).

Full military honors were rendered by the U.S. Navy Ceremonial Guard at the Old Post Chapel and at the final interment site at ANC. In addition, the ceremony also included a missing man formation flyover by Strike Fighter Squadron 32 (VFA-32), the same squadron Hudner was assigned to when he earned the Medal of Honor. VFA-32 flew out of Naval Air Station Oceana in Virginia Beach, Va.

Chief of Naval Operations Adm. John Richardson gives his condolences to the family of Capt. Thomas J. Hudner Jr. during Hudner’s funeral at Arlington National Cemetery. Hudner was awarded the Medal of Honor for his actions in the Battle of Chosin Reservoir during the Korean War.

Hudner received the Medal of Honor from President Harry S. Truman for “conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity at the risk of his life above and beyond the call of duty” during the Battle of Chosin Reservoir in the Korean War. During a mission, one of his fellow pilots, the Navy’s first African American naval aviator to fly in combat, Ensign Jesse L. Brown, was hit by anti-aircraft fire damaging a fuel line and causing him to crash. After it became clear Brown was seriously injured and unable to free himself, Hudner proceeded to purposefully crash his own aircraft to join Brown and provide aid. Hudner injured his own back during his crash landing, but stayed with Brown until a rescue helicopter arrived. Hudner and the rescue pilot worked in the sub-zero, snow-laden area in an unsuccessful attempt to free Brown from the smoking wreckage. Although the effort to save Brown was not successful, Hudner was recognized for the heroic attempt.

“A hero the day he tried to rescue Jesse, a hero when he served our community, and a hero when he passed,” said Scherry. “Whenever I spoke to him, he always talked of Jesse and Jesse’s family. He never spoke of himself, or anything he did. It was never about Tom… We will, as the first crew of his ship, carry forward his legacy and his values of family, life, equality, and service every day of our lives.”

Hudner was the last living Navy recipient of the Medal of Honor from the Korean War.

Rear Adm. William J. Galinis salutes the family of Capt. Thomas J. Hudner Jr. after presenting them with the national ensign during Hudner’s funeral at Arlington National Cemetery. Hudner was awarded the Medal of Honor for his actions in the Battle of Chosin Reservoir during the Korean War.

After receiving recognition for his heroism, Hudner remained on active duty, completing an additional 22 years of naval service during which his accomplishments include flying 27 combat missions in the Korean War and serving as the executive officer aboard USS Kitty Hawk (CV 63) during the Vietnam War.

PCU Hudner is expected to be commissioned in Boston later this year and will be the 66th Arleigh Burke-class destroyer to join the fleet.

The Naval History and Heritage Command, located at the Washington Navy Yard, is responsible for the preservation, analysis, and dissemination of U.S. naval history and heritage. It provides the knowledge foundation for the Navy by maintaining historically relevant resources and products that reflect the Navy’s unique and enduring contributions through our nation’s history, and supports the fleet by assisting with and delivering professional research, analysis, and interpretive services. NHHC is composed of many activities including the Navy Department Library, the Navy Operational Archives, the Navy art and artifact collections, underwater archeology, Navy histories, ten museums, USS Constitution repair facility and the historic ship Nautilus.
 

A Sailor plays Taps during the funeral for Capt. Thomas J. Hudner Jr. at Arlington National Cemetery. Hudner was awarded the Medal of Honor for his actions in the Battle of Chosin Reservoir during the Korean War.

 

Rear Adm. William J. Galinis prepares to present the national ensign to the family of Capt. Thomas J. Hudner Jr. during Hudner’s funeral at Arlington National Cemetery. Hudner was awarded the Medal of Honor for his actions in the Battle of Chosin Reservoir during the Korean War.

 

Sailors render a 21-gun salute Capt. Thomas J. Hudner Jr. at Arlington National Cemetery during Hudner’s funeral. Hudner was awarded the Medal of Honor for his actions in the Battle of Chosin Reservoir during the Korean War.

 

Medal of Honor recipient retired Capt. Thomas Hudner salutes while taps is played during the Centennial of Naval Aviation wreath laying ceremony at the United States Navy Memorial in Washington, D.C., Hudner received the medal of honor for his attempted rescue of Ens. Jesse Brown during the Korean War.




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