Defense

April 28, 2017
 

USS Jackson successfully completes missile test

PO1 Christopher Bright
USS Jackson

The littoral combat ship USS Jackson (LCS 6) sits pierside in San Diego. USS Jackson is an Independence variant LCS and the third vessel of the trimaran design. Jackson was christened on March 22, 2014 and commissioned on December 5, 2015 in Gulfport, Miss.

Littoral combat ship (LCS) USS Jackson (LCS 6) successfully fired a SeaRAM missile against an aerial drone, destroying the target in a test off the Southern California coast, April 22, 2017.

The drone was simulating an anti-ship missile as part of a Combat System Ship Qualification Trials (CSSQT) event to demonstrate the self-defense capability of the ship against an aerial target.

“I couldn’t be more proud of my crew and all the hard work we have put forth in preparing for and accomplishing the CSSQT events,” said Cmdr. Patrick Keller, Jackson’s commanding officer.

CSSQT events are designed to test the ship’s ability to track and disable high-speed maneuvering surface targets and defeat long range anti-shipping air threats. Planned and coordinated by the LCS Shipbuilding Program Office, the CSSQT included firing exercises using the 57mm gun against a fast attack craft. Jackson’s crew, along with personnel from Naval Surface Warfare Center, Port Hueneme Division, completed each scenario successfully and exercised Jackson’s combat systems suite.

“It’s been a long journey, with a lot of training, effort, and dedication,” said Keller. “These events further demonstrate that my team is ready to fight and defend Jackson, and that our ship is ready when called. I couldn’t be happier with the results.”

Constructed by Austal USA in Mobile, Alabama, USS Jackson is an Independence variant LCS and the third vessel of the trimaran design. Jackson was christened on March 22, 2014 and commissioned on Dec. 5, 2015 in Gulfport, Miss.

LCS is a high-speed, agile, shallow draft, focused-mission surface combatant designed for operations in the littoral environment, yet fully capable of open ocean operations. LCS is complementary to the surface fleet, with the ability to counter and outpace evolving threats independently or within a network of surface combatants. Paired with advanced sonar and mine hunting capabilities, LCS provides a major contribution, as well a more diverse set of options to commanders, across the spectrum of operations.




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