News

October 6, 2017
 

Army camp built to protect early settlers

Fort Huachuca is a product of the Indian Wars of the 1870s and 1880s. In February 1877, Col. August Kautz, commander of the Department of Arizona, ordered that a camp be established in the Huachuca Mountains. This camp would offer protection to settlers and travel routes in southeastern Arizona while simultaneously blocking the traditional Apache escape routes through the San Pedro and Santa Cruz valleys to sanctuary in Mexico. A temporary camp was established at the post’s current location on March 3, 1877, by Capt. Samuel Marmaduke Whitside with two companies of the 6th Cavalry. The site was selected because it had fresh running water, an abundance of trees, excellent observation in three directions, and protective high ground for security against Apache tactical methods. Camp Huachuca was redesignated a fort in 1882.

In 1886, Gen. Nelson Miles designated Fort Huachuca as his advance headquarters and forward supply base for the Geronimo campaign. Geronimo’s surrender in August 1886 practically ended the Apache danger in southern Arizona. The Army closed more than 50 camps and forts in the territory, but Fort Huachuca was retained because of continuing border troubles involving renegade Indians, Mexican bandits, and American outlaws and freebooters.

In 1913, the 10th Cavalry “Buffalo Soldiers” arrived and remained almost 20 years. The 10th Cavalry joined Gen. John J. Pershing in the 1916 expedition into Mexico and, during World War I, it was assigned the mission of guarding the United States-Mexico border.

By 1933, the 25th Infantry Regiment had replaced the 10th Cavalry as the main combat unit for the fort. The 25th, in turn, was absorbed by the 93rd Infantry Division during World War II. When the 93rd departed for the Pacific in 1943, the 92nd Infantry Division arrived at the fort for training and subsequent assignment to the European Theater. During the war years, the troop strength reached 30,000 men at the fort, which in the 1930s had been described as suitable for a brigade-sized unit of about 10,000 men.

At war’s end, the fort was declared surplus and transferred to the State of Arizona. It was reactivated during the Korean War by the Army Engineers.

A new era began in 1954 when control passed to the Chief Signal Officer, who found the area and climate ideal for testing electronic and communications equipment. The importance of the fort in the national defense picture grew steadily from that moment. In 1967, Fort Huachuca became the headquarters of the U.S. Army Strategic Communications Command.

Then, in 1971, the post became the home of the U.S. Army Intelligence Center and School, bringing with it the School Brigade.

The Strategic Communications Command became the U.S. Army Communications Command in 1973, subsequently changing to the U.S. Army Information Systems Command in 1984.

In October 1990, the post changed hands with the U.S. Army Training and Doctrine Command, which became the new host command; the U.S. Army Intelligence Center and Fort Huachuca now operates the post.

Today, Fort Huachuca is a major military installation in Arizona, and one of prominence throughout the Southwest.

Courtesy of Huachuca.army.mil




All of this week's top headlines to your email every Friday.


 
 

 
1

Cardinals salute military members

Airman 1st Class Zoie Rider Members of the 306th and 68th Rescue Squadrons pose Nov. 18 with Chief Master Sgt. Ronald Thompson, 56th Fighter Wing command chief, for a picture during the Arizona Cardinals Salute to Service game ...
 
 
DLNFP3

Desert Lightning News Digital Edition – December 7, 2018

Desert Lightning News – Digital and print publication serving Davis Monthan AFB, Tucson AZ and surrounding communities Happy Holidays to everyone at D-M AFB, from the staff of Aerotech News! Click on the link below for a digi...
 
 

Eyes wide open: The time we saved a life

F. E. WARREN AIR FORCE BASE, Wyo. — As Airmen, we are constantly preparing to be ready for the worst days of our lives. We live by a fit-to-fight ethos and maintain readiness for the most extreme of emergency situations. Sometimes, though, we realize we aren’t just prepared to fight for our lives, we remember...