Boeing starts production of T-7A weapons systems trainers, operational flight trainer

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The T-7A Red Hawk weapons systems trainers and operational flight trainer will provide future pilots with “real-as-it-gets” simulation training to complement their time in the actual aircraft. The simulator reinforces the “flight” experience with high-end optics and dynamic motion seats. (Boeing photograph by Eric Shindelbower)
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Simulators are part of the U.S. Air Force’s T-7A Red Hawk advanced training system. Ground-based training provides “real-as-it-gets” simulation with dynamic motion seats and 8K native projectors, the highest resolution ever fielded in a simulator

The U.S. Air Force is one step closer to receiving its next-generation trainer as Boeing started producing the T-7A Red Hawk’s “real-as-it-gets” ground-based training system.

Boeing teams are currently assembling the first two weapons systems trainers and an operational flight trainer at the company’s St. Louis, Mo., site. These simulators, which are the foundation for pilot training and key to the Air Force’s readiness, can digitally connect to actual T-7A aircraft and enable live virtual constructive and embedded training scenarios.

“The Red Hawk’s training system is arguably the most advanced in the world. It’s a game changer,” said Chuck Dabundo, vice president of Boeing T-7 Programs. “This system is 100% integrated with the pilot’s real-world experience, offering ‘real-as-it-gets’ simulation. We’re working closely with the U.S. Air Force and look forward to testing and fielding the devices.” 

The training simulators are equipped with high-fidelity crew stations that include dynamic motion seats and the Boeing Constant Resolution Visual System’s 8K native projectors, offering 16 times the clarity of traditional high-definition video (1080p).

“This is the most accurate, immersive experience that any pilot can have outside the aircraft,” said Sherri Koehnemann, T-7A Training & Sustainment director at Boeing Global Services. “We’ve integrated the training across the board, including ‘one push’ software updates. What a pilot sees in the classroom, on his or her desktop training devices, and in the operational and weapon systems trainers will be what they see in the jet. Future pilots can expect more holistic, immersive training.”

The T-7A’s GBTS was built on an open systems architecture of hardware and digital software that will allow it to grow with the Air Force’s evolving needs.

Boeing expects to deliver the first T-7A Red Hawk simulators to the Air Force in 2023.
 
 
 

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