EOD drops BDU-33s to showcase handling procedures

Tech. Sgt. Michael Alger (right), 56th Civil Engineer Squadron Explosive Ordnance Disposal team leader, provides an explosive safety briefing to Airmen prior to intentionally dropping a BDU-33 ordnance during a demonstration, Nov. 18, 2020, at Luke Air Force Base, Ariz. EOD Airmen offered three scenarios to illustrate the importance of properly handling the ordnance. The EOD flight maintains 24-hour emergency response capability and neutralizes explosive threats to personnel and property.

Staff Sgt. Moises Gonzalez, 56th Civil Engineer Squadron Explosive Ordnance Disposal technician, remotely initiates a BDU-33 ordnance inside a protective enclosure during a weapons safety demonstration, Nov. 18, 2020, at Luke Air Force Base, Arizona. EOD performed the demonstration, displaying hazards for handling a BDU-33 to enhance safety procedures by 56th Fighter Wing members. When initiated, the ordnance releases a flash of fire and smoke that permits visual evaluation of accuracy. The EOD flight maintains 24-hour emergency response capability and neutralizes explosive threats to personnel and property. (U.S. Air Force photo by Airman 1st Class Brooke Moeder)
A t-shirt is charred following the initiation of a BDU-33 ordnance during a weapons safety demonstration, Nov. 18, 2020, at Luke Air Force Base, Arizona. Airmen from the 56th Civil Engineer Squadron Explosive Ordnance Disposal team provided a live demonstration to weapons handlers and 56th Fighter Wing members showcasing the susceptibility of impact during build up or transport of the ordnance. The EOD flight maintains 24-hour emergency response capability and neutralizes explosive threats to personnel and property. (U.S. Air Force photo by Airman 1st Class Brooke Moeder)

Staff Sgt. Jeffrey Knelange, (left), 56th Civil Engineer Squadron Explosive Ordnance Disposal technician, and Senior Airman Jack Jorgensen, 56th CES EOD team member, prepare a live BDU-33 ordnance for a demonstration, Nov. 18, 2020, at Luke Air Force Base, Arizona. The BDU-33 is a practice munition used to simulate the use of 500 pound munitions. The EOD flight maintains 24-hour emergency response capability and neutralizes explosive threats to personnel and property. (U.S. Air Force photo by Airman 1st Class Brooke Moeder)
A BDU-33 ordnance initiates while inside a protective enclosure, Nov. 18, 2020, at Luke Air Force Base, Arizona. The 56th Civil Engineer Squadron Explosive Ordnance Disposal team conducted a demonstration to test the susceptibility of impact of the ordnance during build up, transport and loading onto aircraft. When detonated, the ordnance releases a flash of fire and smoke that permits visual evaluation of accuracy. The EOD flight maintains 24-hour emergency response capability and neutralizes explosive threats to personnel and property. (U.S. Air Force photo by Airman 1st Class Brooke Moeder)

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