2020 Year in Review: Luke at Work

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Ammo uses new system for inventory count

Senior Airman Marcus Wallace, 56th Equipment Maintenance Squadron line delivery technician (left), and Airman 1st Class Preston Melkerson, 56th EMS stockpile management technician, take inventory on small arms ammunition during the semi-annual 100% munitions check Sept. 12, 2020, at Luke Air Force Base, Arizona. During the counting process, everything in the stockpile is inventoried including missiles, bomb components, explosive cartridges and more. The 56th EMS Ammunition Flight performs an inventory check which maintains accountability for more than 3,470 munition components worth an estimated $72 million. (U.S. Air Force photo by Airman 1st Class Brooke Moeder)
Airman 1st Class Preston Melkerson, 56th Equipment Maintenance Squadron stockpile management technician, moves a box of small arms ammunition during inventory Sept. 12, 2020, at Luke Air Force Base, Arizona. Airmen from the 56th EMS provide safe and reliable aircraft, equipment and munitions which are used to train the world’s greatest fighter pilots and combat ready Airmen. The 56th EMS Ammunition Flight performs a semi-annual 100% munitions check which maintains accountability of more than 3,470 munition components worth an estimated $72 million. (U.S. Air Force photo by Airman 1st Class Brooke Moeder)
Tech. Sgt. Ryan Read, 56th Equipment Maintenance Squadron account supervisor, validates the munitions inventory count on the Theater Integrated Combat Munitions System (TICMS), Sept. 12, 2020, at Luke Air Force Base, Arizona. TICMS is an Air Force-wide program released in January 2020 that saves manpower and time by allowing individuals to enter the amount of items digitally using Getac, a handheld device used to input number values, avoiding the need for count sheets. The 56th EMS Ammunition Flight performs a semi-annual 100% munitions check which maintains accountability for more than 3,470 munition components worth an estimated $72 million. (U.S. Air Force photo by Airman 1st Class Brooke Moeder)
Senior Airman Gunnar Carlson, 56th Equipment Maintenance Squadron stockpile management technician, scans the barcodes on corner markers using a Getac, a handheld device used to input number values, Sept. 17, 2020, at Luke Air Force Base, Arizona. The 56th EMS Ammunitions Flight is projected to use the scanning method on the Getac during the semi-annual munitions inventory to eliminate the need for count sheets. A 100% munitions check is performed to maintain accountability for more than 3,470 munition components worth an estimated $72 million. (U.S. Air Force photo by Airman 1st Class Brooke Moeder)
Senior Airman Michael Castellanos, 56th Equipment Maintenance Squadron conventional maintenance technician, counts the number of aircraft countermeasure munitions Sept. 12, 2020, at Luke Air Force Base, Arizona. During the counting process, everything in the stockpile is inventoried including missiles, bomb components, explosive cartridges and more. The 56th EMS Ammunition Flight performs a semi-annual 100% munitions check which maintains accountability for more than 3,470 munition components worth an estimated $72 million. (U.S. Air Force photo by Airman 1st Class Brooke Moeder)
Airmen from the 56th Equipment Maintenance Squadron count aircraft countermeasure munitions during the semi-annual 100% munitions check Sept. 12, 2020, at Luke Air Force Base, Arizona. The Theater Integrated Combat Munitions System (TICMS) is a new software used to maintain accountability of munitions by making the counting process, formerly a paper system, digital. The 56th EMS Ammunition Flight performs munition checks to maintain accountability for more than 3,470 munition components worth an estimated $72 million. (U.S. Air Force photo by Airman 1st Class Brooke Moeder)

Civil engineer Airmen have dirty job

Senior Airman Jaime Villagomez (bottom left) and Airman 1st Class Manolo Hernandez (bottom right), 56th Civil Engineer Squadron water and fuels system maintenance technicians, maintain a fire hydrant system while Jerome Stanton, 56th CES WFSM technician, observes, Nov. 2, 2020, at Luke Air Force Base, Arizona. To meet mission requirements, the 56th CES technicians replaced an isolation valve and installed a fire hydrant. Nicknamed the “Dirt Boyz,” CE Airmen maintain Luke’s runways, sidewalks, drainage systems and repair roads and barriers along the base perimeter. (U.S. Air Force photo by Airman 1st Class Brooke Moeder)

Adjusting the brakes

Airman 1st Class Wesley De Leon, 56th Component Maintenance Squadron aircraft hydraulic systems journeyman, torques adjusting assemblers onto an F-16 Fighting Falcon brake housing Aug. 17, 2020. Hydraulics specialists ensure the hydraulic and pneumatic systems work properly, guaranteeing the landing gear is functional. The hydraulics flight works on F-16, A-10 Thunderbolt II and F-15 Eagle landing gear and brakes for Luke and other bases to ensure Air Force mission success. (Photos by Airman 1st Class Brooke Moeder)
De Leon torques adjusting assemblers onto an F-16 Fighting Falcon brake Aug. 17, 2020.

Lockheed Martin, Luke team to innovate

Airman 1st Class Delwyn Travillion, 56th Component Maintenance Squadron aircrew egress systems apprentice (left), trains on a virtual reality maintenance trainer while Tech. Sgt. Ian Rider, 56th CMS aircrew egress systems craftsman, monitors training July 13, 2020. The egress shop is responsible for the overall integrity of the emergency ejection seat system in the F-35A Lightning II. The egress shop implemented the virtual reality maintenance trainer to enhance training efficiency and reduce training time. (Photos by Airman 1st Class Dominic Tyler)
Senior Airman Matthew Romano, 56th Component Maintenance Squadron aircrew egress systems journeyman (left), trains Airman 1st Class Delwyn Travillion, 56th CMS aircrew egress systems apprentice, on the installation of flexible linear shaped charge (FLSC) on a 3D-printed F35A Lightning II canopy July 13, 2020. The 3D print of the F-35 canopy enables training on the installation of the FLSC without using operational resources. Installation of the FLSC is an essential task that requires zero errors.

20/20 vision in 2020

Senior Airman Troy Dibley, 61st Fighter Squadron F-35A Lightning II avionics journeyman, tries on a pair of prescription glasses June 9, 2020, at Luke Air Force Base. The Luke Optometry clinic provides a choice of more than 50 styles of customized and standard frames. The Luke optometry clinic treats more than 4,000 patients every year. (Airman 1st Class Brooke Moeder)

Veterinary clinic provides care for service animals

Daniel Halbleib, Ajo Station Border Patrol agent, holds Marci’s mouth open while Nicole Avci examines his teeth Jan. 24, 2020, in the clinic at Luke AFB. Marci, a border patrol dog, was at the appointment for a suspected abscessed tooth caused by chewing on metal objects. The clinic cares for active-duty and retiree member’s privately owned cats and dogs, military working dogs and government-owned dogs by performing annual wellness exams, vaccines and more. (Airman 1st Class Brooke Moeder)

Armament shop maintains F-35 weapons system equipment

Senior Airman Janey Sawmiller, 56th Equipment Maintenance Squadron F-35A Lightning II maintenance supervisor, adjustments an F-35 bulk loader, Oct. 20, 2020, at Luke Air Force Base, Arizona. There are nine ammunition bulk loaders at Luke AFB, each one housing four magazines. The 56th EMS F-35 armament shop maintains, inspects and order alternate mission equipment for the F-35’s weapons system. (U.S. Air Force photo by Airman 1st Class Brooke Moeder)

BEE Airmen, ‘Jack of all Trades’

Senior Airman Megan Johnson and Airman 1st Class Emmanuel Alaniz, 56th Operational Medicine Readiness Squadron bioenvironmental engineering technicians, search for leaks on a Level A HAZMAT suit Jan. 14, 2020. Level A suits protect against harmful vapors, gases, mists and particles reaching the individual inside the suit. The 56th OMRS BEE’s mission is to provide reliable health risk expertise to optimize human performance and prevent adverse health effects on Airmen. (Airman 1st Class Brooke Moeder)

Base continues training mission

Tech. Sgt. James Hayes, 63rd Aircraft Maintenance Unit instructor, marshals an F-35A Lightning II, April 8, 2020. Maintainers at Luke enable the mission by launching and recovering aircraft, inspecting components and ensuring aircraft are serviceable to fly. Luke is home to 77 F-16s and 98 F-35s, enabling assigned Airmen to train the world’s greatest fighter pilots and combat-ready Airmen. (Airman 1st Class Brooke Moeder)

56th SFS conducts
presence patrol

Tech. Sgt. Jose Martinez, 56th Security Forces Squadron Defense Force day-shift flight sergeant (left), and Tech. Sgt. Joseph Campbell, 56th SFS Defense Force NCO in charge of training and confinement, prepare for a patrol May 21, 2020, at the Luke Air Force Base auxiliary range in Southern Arizona. A team of 20 defenders and one military working dog conducted a night presence patrol on the range. The 56th SFS consists of more than 200 personnel who ensure the safety of the base population. (Senior airman Leala Marquez)

SLOTUS gets cockpit view of Viper

Maj. Jessa Charron (left), 69th Fighter Squadron F-16 Fighting Falcon instructor pilot, and Col. George Watkins (right), 56th Operations Group commander, brief Karen Pence (center), wife of Vice President Mike Pence, about the F-16’s capabilities Sept. 17, 2020. Pence, along with Secretary of the Air Force Barbara Barrett and Sharene Brown, wife of Air Force Chief of Staff Gen. Charles Brown, visited Luke to engage with military spouses and discuss military spouse employment. (Senior Airman Caroline Burnett)

56th Ammunitions Flight builds 72 laser-guided bombs

Airman Quinton Chaney, 56th Equipment Maintenance Squadron munitions systems technician, and Senior Airman Tre Tate, 56th EMS munitions systems technician, use a forklift sling to move GBU-12 Paveway II laser-guided bombs Sept. 22, 2020. (Photos by Airman 1st Class Caleb F. Butler)
Airman 1st Class Maxim Gogo, 56th Equipment Maintenance Squadron munitions systems technician, separates parts to be installed on GBU-12 Paveway II laser-guided bombs Sept 22, 2020. Airmen assembled 24 bombs during the first day of the three-day build session to maintain a steady supply of munitions for the base. The munitions flight assembles, stores, and transports explosives for all eight maintenance units at Luke, ensuring pilots are able to train with realistic ammunition.
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