944FW May Warrior of the Month

The 944th Fighter Wing May 2021 Warrior of the Month is Tech. Sgt. Chad Thomson, an advanced fighter aircraft integrated avionics craftsman with the 944th Aircraft Maintenance Squadron.

His responsibilities include maintaining the avionics systems on the F-35 and also providing classroom and hands on training to ensure the Reserve Citizen Airmen meet the requirements for their upgrade training.

Thomson was recognized for his efforts responding to a security pin-in issue on the aircraft that prevented the pilot from taking off. He discovered the faulty electronic equipment, corrected the malfunction and verified it was operational resulting in the aircraft’s return to flight. Additionally, while temporarily assigned to Nellis Air Force Base in Las Vegas, Nevada, Thomson used his eight years as a technician and Lockheed Martin Field Service Engineer experience on the F-35, to teach mission system theory and troubleshooting practices to active duty and reserve personnel.

Lastly, Thomson attended a preview for a Wire Chaffing Awareness course hosted by The Griffin at Hill AFB, Utah. He provided valuable feedback and critiques that will be implemented into the now mandatory training course for all aircraft maintainers.

Thomson, a native of Spanaway, Wash., said one of the most satisfying aspects of this job is to be presented with a complex issue and figuring out how to resolve it.

“It feels good when you can put all of your technical expertise and training to use and keep the aircraft flying,” he added. “I also enjoy passing on the knowledge and skills I have learned over the years to the next generation of maintainers.”

As a civilian, Thomson works for Lockheed Martin as a field support engineer on the F-35 program at Luke AFB, where he is responsible for providing technical assistance and training to maintainers. He relays any issues seen in the field to system engineers to help sustain field operations.

Thomson lives in Goodyear, Ariz., with his wife, Laura.

“Together we have two kids and way too many cats,” Thomson said.

More Stories