Defense

February 17, 2016
 

US Army awards Raytheon $31.8 million contract for continued Excalibur production

U.S. Marines fire an M982 Excalibur round from an M777 155 mm howitzer during a fire support mission at Fire Base Fiddlers Green, Helmand province, Afghanistan, Oct. 1, 2011.

The U.S. Army awarded Raytheon a $31.8 million contract to produce and deliver 464 Excalibur Ib extended-range precision projectiles.

In full-rate production since mid-2014, Excalibur Ib has revolutionized cannon artillery, making it possible to engage targets precisely at long ranges. Excalibur is the longest-range, most precise, cannon-fired projectile in the world.

“There is growing demand in the international market for Excalibur’s accurate, first-round effects capability,” said Duane Gooden, Raytheon Land Warfare Systems vice president. Raytheon has also funded an internal development program aimed at bringing Excalibur’s unprecedented capabilities to the maritime domain.”

To meet the U.S. Navy’s need, Raytheon is developing Excalibur N5, a 5-inch/127 mm variant that uses Excalibur Ib guidance and navigation unit and an overall re-use of 70 percent of Excalibur Ib parts and components. Additionally, the N5 uses 99 percent of the Ib system’s software.

In 2015, the company test-fired Excalibur N5 at the Yuma Proving Grounds, scoring direct hits on targets more than 20 nautical miles away. The successful test demonstrated the maturity and low-risk nature of leveraging the Army’s program to quickly field a much-needed, affordable U.S. Navy capability.

Excalibur is a precision-guided, extended-range projectile that uses GPS guidance to provide accurate, first-round effects capability in any environment. Excalibur’s level of precision creates a major reduction in the time, cost and logistical burden associated with using other artillery munitions.

  • Combat-proven: Nearly 800 Excalibur rounds have been fired in combat with exceptional accuracy and lethality
  • Precise: Excalibur consistently strikes less than two meters from a precisely-located target
  • Responsive: Excalibur dramatically reduces mission response time
  • Safe: Excalibur’s precision practically eliminates collateral damage and has been employed within 75 meters of supported troops
  • Affordable: With its first round effects, Excalibur reduces total mission cost and time and the user’s logistics burden
  • Evolving: Raytheon is adding a laser spot tracker to compensate for target location error, maintain precision in GPS denied or degraded environments, and enable engagement of relocated or moving targets
  • Entering new markets: With Excalibur N5, navies will be able to deliver extended-range, precision naval surface fires



All of this week's top headlines to your email every Friday.


 
 

 
Navy photograph

FRC East achieves another F-35 milestone, completing first F-35A, C modifications

Navy photograph A piloted Lightning II F-35A, AF-10, taxis along the Fleet Readiness Center East flight line June 7, head to Eglin Air Force Base, Fla. The departure signifies the depot’s achievement of having now receive...
 
 

DOD partners with LinkedIn, offers military spouses free membership

The Defense Department’s Spouse Education and Career Opportunities program is launching a new partnership with LinkedIn — the virtual professional networking platform. Military spouses will soon have access to a free LinkedIn Premium membership, valid for one year, every time they have a permanent-change-of-station move, including access to more than 12,000 online professional courses t...
 
 

Around the Air Force: June 15

On this look Around the Air Force, AWACS aircraft support an exercise in the Baltics, an Airman’s invention saves the Air Force money and JTACs train with partner nations during Saber Strike 18.