Veterans

December 11, 2017
 

Vet Briefs December 11

Remains of Minnesota WWII sailor to be laid to rest in May

MANKATO, Minn.–The remains of a southern Minnesota sailor killed at Pearl Harbor will be laid to rest more than seven decades after his death.

Radioman 2nd Class Quentin Gifford, 22, was on the USS Oklahoma when it was capsized by torpedoes in December 1941, The Mankato Free Press reported. The U.S. Navy had listed Gifford as lost in action since February 1942.

Human remains from the attack site were taken to a Navy lab in 1941. Relatively few of the seamen were identified and all unidentified remains were buried in a Hawaii gravesite. The Navy began exhuming soldiers in 2015 to analyze their DNA. Three of Gifford’s siblings contributed DNA for analysis in 2016. Gifford’s remains were identified in July.

“I had this hope his body had been completely destroyed — that he had not been obliged to suffer,” said Harold Gifford, Quentin Gifford’s brother. Details from the military about his brother’s remains indicate that he likely died quickly, Harold Gifford said.

Services will be held at Fort Snelling National Cemetery on May 2, Gifford said.

“(We) decided on the first Saturday in May,” Gifford said. “That’s a much better time for an outdoor service. And there’s plenty of time to do it right.”

The service will include a 21-gun salute. Quentin Gifford’s casket will be accompanied by an honor guard detail to a Twin Cities area fire hall.
“That’s where the family will congregate,” his brother said. AP




All of this week's top headlines to your email every Friday.


 
 

 
Courtesy photograph

Greatest sacrifice: B-24 Liberator pilot identified, repatriated after 73 years

Courtesy photograph U.S. Army Air Corps 1st Lt. John D. Crouchley, kneeling, second right, and his crew pose for a photo by their B-24 Liberator, “Miss Yankee Rebel” in 1944. Crouchley was assigned to the 828th Bombardment ...
 
 
Photograph courtesy of James Lawrence

The tragedy of LZ Albany: Teaching lessons of a battle lost

Photograph courtesy of James Lawrence Twenty-four-year-old, 1st Lt. James Lawrence at his base camp in Vietnam, shortly before the battle of Landing Zone Albany. Lawrence, now 77, speaks with organziations and Soldiers about th...
 
 
Navy photograph by Alana Chargualaf

Guam son killed during World War II comes home

Navy photograph by JoAnna Delfin The Joint Region Marianas funeral honor detail escort the remains of Steward Mate 1st Class Ignacio Camacho Farfan into the chapel at the Guam Veterans Cemetery in Piti Nov. 8. Farfan died Dec. ...