Headlines – July 15, 2019

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News

Army identifies spec ops sergeant major who died in Afghanistan-
Sgt. Maj. James G. “Ryan” Sartor, 40, a Special Forces company sergeant major, died July 13 during combat operations in Faryab province, Afghanistan, the Army announced July 14.
 
Turkey has the S-400. The Trump administration is silent-
After months of threatening quick, severe action against Turkey should Ankara accept the Russian-made S-400 air defense system, the Trump administration has yet to react to the delivery of the weapon system.
 
 

Business

State approves half-billion MH-60R helo sale to Greece-
The State Department has cleared a possible $600 million foreign military sale of seven MH-60R Seahawk Multi-Mission helicopters to Greece.
 
France, Australia are working on the same sub, but they’ll be powered differently-
The presence of Australia’s defense minister and the director general of future submarines at the July 12 launch of France’s Suffren, the first-in-class Barracuda nuclear-powered attack submarine, has sent a strong signal that France considers Australia a critical partner in the project.
 
France launches first Barracuda-class nuclear attack sub-
French shipbuilder Naval Group on July 12 launched the Suffren nuclear-powered attack submarine here under the gaze of President Emmanuel Macron.
 
How do Americans feel about U.S. arms sales? Not great-
Congress is still divided on the decision to continue selling weapons to Saudi Arabia, and it turns out the American public feels a similar way.
 
 

Defense

Military budget showdown set as Democrats advance authorization bill over GOP objections-
House Democrats on July 12 advanced a contentious $733 billion defense policy bill packed with progressive priorities that sets up a showdown with Senate Republicans and the White House in coming months over the future direction of the Defense Department.
 
Bid for a higher military pay raise fizzles amid partisan fighting in Congress-
A last-minute bid by House Republicans to dramatically boost next year’s planned military pay raise to 4 percent and add nearly $1 billion in military personnel spending failed amid partisan fighting over the annual defense authorization bill.
 
Why DOD is still using burn pits, even while now acknowledging their danger-
The Pentagon acknowledges the risks of burn pits, which the U.S. military has used to get rid of human, food, equipment and other waste while downrange, and is looking for alternatives while pledging to do a better job tracking how exposure affects service members.
 
Pentagon in its longest-ever stretch of leadership limbo-
When he resigned as defense secretary last December, Jim Mattis thought it might take two months to install a successor. That seemed terribly long at the time.
 
GAO looks at where Pentagon contract awards end up-
The U.S. government awarded more money in contracts to foreign-owned firms located abroad than U.S.-based subsidiaries of foreign-owned firms, according to a government watchdog.
 
Army researchers building ‘smart’ landmines for future combat-
Army leaders see a future battlefield with networked minefields a commander can see from across the globe through satellite communications and that can be scattered in minutes but also retrieved and reused when needed.
 
Army to receive 7.62mm squad marksman rifles as early as next year-
Heckler & Koch Defense Inc. will soon begin delivering thousands of 7.62mm squad-designated marksman rifles to the Army to give infantry and other close-combat units a better chance of penetrating enemy body armor.
 
AWACS catches fire, makes emergency landing in Nebraska-
An Air Force AWACS aircraft out of Tinker Air Force Base, Okla., caught fire while performing touch and goes in Nebraska and was forced to make an emergency landing July 11, according to the Air National Guard.
 
 

Veterans

Department of Veterans Affairs’ new ‘smoke-free’ policy doesn’t apply to employees-
The Department of Veterans Affairs announced its health care facilities will soon be “smoke-free,” though a smoking ban set to take effect Oct. 1 does not apply to employees, the agency clarified July 12.