Sssnake Survey

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Air Force photograph by Staff Sgt. Tabatha McCarthy

Emily Brown, wildlife biologist with Colorado State University, holds a Great Basin collared lizard on the Nellis Test and Training Range, Nev., Oct. 17, 2019. The wildlife biologists partner with the 99th Civil Engineer Squadron to document and conserve wildlife at the range.
 

Air Force photograph by Staff Sgt. Tabatha McCarthy

A gopher snake slithers through gravel on the Nellis Test and Training Range, Nev., Oct. 17, 2019. Adult gopher snakes can reach up to six feet long.
 
Air Force photograph by Staff Sgt. Tabatha McCarthy

Steve Stocking, lead herpetologist with Colorado State University, scans the hillside for rattlesnakes on the Nellis Test and Training Range, Nev., Oct. 17, 2019. Stocking partners with the 99th Civil Engineer Squadron to conduct reptile surveys at known rattlesnake den sites.
 
Air Force photograph by Staff Sgt. Tabatha McCarthy

An adult Great Basin Rattlesnake coils in the rocks on a hillside at the Nellis Test and Training Range, Nev., Oct. 17, 2019. According to Colorado State University herpetologists, rattlesnake bites are rarely fatal. The snake’s venom serves to subdue their prey and is not used as a defense mechanism.
 
Air Force photograph by Staff Sgt. Tabatha McCarthy

Steve Stocking, lead herpetologist with Colorado State University, documents the GPS coordinates for a rattlesnake on the Nellis Test and Training Range, Nev., Oct. 17, 2019. The coordinates are used for the wildlife biologists to be able to find the reptiles and their dens when they go back to the sites.