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July 27, 2018
 

Dedicated Crew Chiefs keep jets, pilots flying

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Airman Bailee Darbasie
Nellis AFB, Nev.

Airman 1st Class Bonifacio Garcia, F-15E Strike Eagle fighter jet assistant dedicated crew chief assigned to 757th Maintenance Squadron Strike Aircraft Maintenance Unit, prepares an F-15E Strike Eagle fighter jet for defueling at Nellis Air Force Base, Nev. Dedicated crew chiefs and ADCCs are highly skilled maintainers with extensive knowledge of their aircraft.

Approximately 50 tactical aircraft maintenance specialists were honored for outstanding commitment at a dedicated crew chief ceremony July 13 in the 57th Wing Strike Aircraft Maintenance Unit hangar at Nellis Air Force Base, Nev.

DCCs are highly skilled maintainers with extensive knowledge of their aircraft; therefore, they must be exceptional maintainers, take pride in their work and assume a large amount of responsibility.

“Dedicated crew chiefs are a unique group of maintainers that excel above the rest and dedicate themselves to learning and maintaining a single aircraft,” said Senior Airman Diana Boroski, F-15E Strike Eagle fighter jet DCC assigned to the 757th Aircraft Maintenance Squadron Strike AMU.

From cleaning the jet to recovering it after a flight, DCCs are a necessity to daily flightline operations.

Airman 1st Class Lucas Cupp, F-15E Strike Eagle fighter jet assistant dedicated crew chief assigned to 757th Maintenance Squadron Strike Aircraft Maintenance Unit, uses headset equipment to communicate with a ground member during a defueling process at Nellis Air Force Base, Nev. Communication between a dedicated crew chief, their ADCC and their pilots is vital for ensuring safety and understanding.

“Dedicated crew chiefs need to work the hardest because there’s a lot of responsibility that falls on their shoulders,” said Airman 1st Class Bonifacio Garcia, F-15E Strike Eagle fighter jet assistant DCC assigned to the 757th AMXS Strike AMU. “They’re responsible for getting the aircraft up in the air, ensuring the pilot is safe, recovering the aircraft and getting it ready for the next flight. Without crew chiefs, there is no mission.”

Consequently, their hard work and dedication earns them the privilege of having their names stenciled on the side of their jets. Wherever the aircraft goes, the DCCs name goes with it, instilling pride and ownership.

“When people look at my jet, they see my name,” said Staff Sgt. Samantha Buxton, F-35 Lightning II fighter jet DCC assigned to the 757th AMXS Lightning AMU. “It motivates me to work harder and make sure I’m always doing my absolute best.”

Despite long hours, hazardous conditions and highly stressful situations, DCCs stay on top of their game to get the mission accomplished.

“I love seeing the bigger picture, watching the jets fly and knowing we, as DCCs, made that happen,” said Buxton. 
 

Airman 1st Class Bonifacio Garcia, F-15E Strike Eagle fighter jet assistant dedicated crew chief assigned to 757th Maintenance Squadron Strike Aircraft Maintenance Unit, disconnects a hose from an F-15E Strike Eagle at Nellis Air Force Base, Nev. ADCCs are responsible for supporting dedicated crew chiefs with all work pertaining to their aircraft.

 

Airman 1st Class Lucas Cupp, assistant dedicated crew chief assigned to 757th Maintenance Squadron Strike Aircraft Maintenance Unit, connects hydraulic lines to an F-15E Strike Eagle at Nellis Air Force Base, Nev. Despite long hours, hazardous conditions and highly stressful situations, maintainers stay on top of their game to get the mission accomplished.

 

Airman 1st Class Lucas Cupp, F-15E Strike Eagle fighter jet assistant dedicated crew chief assigned to 757th Maintenance Squadron Strike Aircraft Maintenance Unit, cleans the canopy of an F-15E Strike Eagle at Nellis Air Force Base, Nev. Dedicated crew chiefs and ADCCs are expected to be exceptional maintainers, take pride in their work and assume a large amount of responsibility.

 

Master Sgt. Sarah Flagg, production superintendent assigned to 757th Maintenance Squadron Strike Aircraft Maintenance Unit, reviews aircraft forms in preparation of an F-15E Strike Eagle fighter jet take off at Nellis Air Force Base, Nev. Attention to detail is important for everyone working on the flightline to ensure the safety of maintainers and aircrew.




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