Technology

October 14, 2016
 

A laser-sharp view of blended wing body plane design

NASA photograph by David C. Bowman

Engineers at NASA’s Langley Research Center in Hampton, Va., used lasers inside the 14- by 22-Foot Subsonic Tunnel to map how air flows over a Boeing Blended Wing Body (BWB) model – a greener, quieter airplane design under development. The name for the technique is called particle image velocimetry. If you look closely you can see the light bouncing off tracer particles. Cameras record the movement of those particles as the laser light pulses across the model. This allows researchers to accurately measure the flow over the model once the images are processed. A smoother flow over the wing means less fuel will be needed to power the aircraft.




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Headlines – March 22, 2019

News A government watchdog is investigating Trump’s defense secretary. Here’s why – The Department of Defense Inspector General announced March 20 it had initiated an investigation into Acting Defense Secretary Patrick Shanahan over reports that he has disparaged competing defense companies to the potential benefit of his former firm, Boeing.     Business America’s fighter...
 
 

News Briefs – March 22, 2019

Europe, Canada to do own reviews of Boeing flight system The decision by Europe and Canada to break with U.S. air-safety regulators is likely to delay the resumption of flights by the Boeing 737 Max after two deadly crashes. The Europeans and Canadians vow to conduct their own reviews of Boeing’s changes to a key...
 
 

Lockheed Martin delivers first HC-130J Combat King II to NY Air National Guard

Lockheed Martin photograph by Todd R. McQueen The first HC-130J Commando II assigned to the N.Y. Air National Guard’s 106th Rescue Wing departs Lockheed Martin’s facility in Marietta, Ga., where all C-130s are built. Lockhe...