Operation teeth cleaning: Vet clinic keeps MWDs mission ready

0
302

U.S. Air Force photo by Senior Airman Mikaley Kline

Chester, 99th Security Forces Squadron military working dog, lays on the floor after receiving a pre-anesthetic at the Veterinary Clinic on Nellis Air Force Base, Nev., Oct. 15. The Veterinary Clinic at Nellis AFB provides treatment for approximately 20 MWDs.
 

U.S. Air Force photo by Senior Airman Mikaley Kline

Chester, 99th Security Forces Squadron military working dog, lies on a table after receiving a sedative at the veterinary clinic on Nellis Air Force Base, Nev., Oct. 15. Annual teeth cleaning are important because if the MWDs have bad teeth they cannot do their job effectively.
 

U.S. Air Force photo by Senior Airman Mikaley Kline

Karla Larsen, 99th Medical Group veterinary technician, administers a sedative to Chester, 99th Security Forces Squadron military working dog, at the veterinary clinic on Nellis Air Force Base, Nev., Oct. 15. The three parts to giving an animal anesthesia are the premedication stage, the induction stage, and the maintenance of the anesthesia.
 

U.S. Air Force photo by Senior Airman Mikaley Kline

Karla Larsen, 99th Medical Group veterinary technician, cleans the teeth of Chester, 99th Security Forces Squadron military working dog, at the veterinary clinic on Nellis Air Force Base, Nev., Oct. 15. The veterinary clinic strives to see each MWD at least once a year for a teeth cleaning.
 

U.S. Air Force photo by Senior Airman Mikaley Kline

Karla Larsen, 99th Medical Group veterinary technician, cleans the teeth of Chester, 99th Security Forces Squadron military working dog, at the veterinary clinic on Nellis Air Force Base, Nev., Oct. 15. Teeth cleaning can take approximately 30 to 60 minutes to complete depending on the condition of the dog’s teeth.