Aircrews, maintenance specialists keep Red Flag 16-1 airborne

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U.S. Air Force photo by Senior Airman Timothy Young

Airman 1st Class Alex Ritsema (left) aircraft armament systems specialist and Airman 1st Class Wilbenis Cardona, assistant dedicated crew chief, both assigned to the 335th Aircraft Maintenance Unit, Seymour Johnson Air Force Base, N.C., secure a panel after inspecting internal components on an F-15E Strike Eagle during Red Flag 16-1 at Nellis Air Force Base, Nev., Jan. 28. The F-15E has the capability to fight at low altitude, day or night and in all weather, as well as the capability to fight its way to a target over long ranges and destroy enemy ground positions.
 

U.S. Air Force photo by Airman 1st Class Kevin J. Tanenbaum

An aircrew member from the 7th Bomb Wing out of Dyess Air Force Base, Texas, prepares to enter a B-1B Lancer before take-off at Red Flag 16-1 at Nellis AFB, Nev., Jan. 29. Red Flag involves a variety of attack, fighter, bomber, reconnaissance, electronic warfare, air lift support, and search and rescue aircraft.
 
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Airman 1st Class Wilbenis Cardona, assistant dedicated crew chief, assigned to the 335th Aircraft Maintenance Unit, Seymour Johnson Air Force Base, N.C., communicates with a pilot and weapon systems officer of an F-15E Strike Eagle prior to taxiing during Red Flag 16-1 at Nellis AFB, Nev., Jan. 28. Red Flag provided combat training in a degraded and operationally-limited environment to both the air crew flying and the maintainers on the ground.
 

U.S. Air Force photo by Airman 1st Class Rachel Loftis

Airman 1st Class Bryce Day, 4th Aircraft Maintenance Squadron jet engine apprentice assigned to Seymour Johson Air Force Base, N.C., prepares to remove chocks on an F-15E Strike Eagle during Red Flag 16-1 at Nellis AFB, Nev., Jan. 28. The 4th AMXS is one of many units participating in Red Flag. The exercise brings together many units across the U.S. Air Force, joint and coalition to test crews in the air and maintenance professionals on the ground.
 

U.S. Air Force photo by Senior Airman Thomas Spangler

Royal Australian Air Force Leading Aircraftman Peatrie Birney finishes maintenance checks on an F/A-18 Hornet from No. 75 Squadron, RAAF Base Tindal, Australia, during Red Flag 16-1 at Nellis Air Force Base, Nev., Jan 26. Red Flag gives the United States and its allies the opportunity to integrate in a combat training environment to help ensure they will be effective while working together in real-world scenarios.
 
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Aircrew assigned to the 7th Bomb Wing from Dyess Air Force Base, Texas, carry equipment to a B-1B Lancer before a mission during Red Flag 16-1. Red Flag missions are conducted on the 2.9 million-acre Nevada Test and Training Range with 1,900 possible targets, realistic threat systems and opposing enemy forces.
 

U.S. Air Force photo by Senior Airman Alex Fox Echols III

Airman 1st Class Nickalos Barentine, 95th Aircraft Maintenance Unit crew chief, Tyndall AFB, Fla., and Airman 1st Class Alexis Aragon, 7th Logistics Readiness Squadron fuels specialist, Dyess AFB, Texas, refuel an F-22 Raptor during Red Flag 16-1, Jan. 28 at Nellis AFB, Nev. Fuels distribution operations are responsible for the refueling of U.S. and allied aircraft for multiple missions per day during Red Flag.
 
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Royal Australian Air Force Corporal Connor O’Neill, performs maintenance on an F/A-18 Hornet from No. 75 Squadron, RAAF Base Tindal, Australia, during Red Flag 16-1, at Nellis Air Force Base, Nev., Jan. 27. Red Flag provides a series of intense air combat scenarios which will help prepare U.S. and allied forces for future real-world conflicts.

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