NDI: catching microscopic problems

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U.S. Air Force photo by Airman 1st Class Kevin Tanenbaum

Charles Duke, Mission First Support Services non-destructive inspection technician, attaches a laser pointer prior to taking an x-ray in the NDI Lab on Nellis Air Force Base, Nev. Sept. 28. The NDI Lab is manned 24 hours a day, seven days a week due to the high number of flights on Nellis AFB.
 

U.S. Air Force photo by Airman 1st Class Kevin Tanenbaum

Stephanie Ramirez, Mission First Support Services non-destructive inspection technician, places a sample tray into an electron microscope for testing in the NDI Lab on Nellis Air Force Base, Nev., Sept. 28. The NDI Lab provides support for approximately 120 permanently assigned aircraft and more than 500 visiting aircraft throughout the year.
 

U.S. Air Force photo by Airman 1st Class Kevin Tanenbaum

Non-destructive inspection technicians receive training on a new x-ray process in the NDI lab on Nellis Air Force Base, Nev., Sept. 28. All NDI technicians are certified per the National Aerospace Standard 410 and must complete a battery of exams prior to certification, and must complete the recertification process every five years.
 

U.S. Air Force photo by Airman 1st Class Kevin Tanenbaum

John Sanders, Mission First Support Services non-destructive inspection shop lead, demonstrates how the florescent magnetic particle inspection finds cracks in parts in the NDI lab on Nellis Air Force Base, Nev., Sept. 28. With these processes the NDI Lab can inspect each piece individually for cracks, breaks, or defects that the human eye can’t see.
 

U.S. Air Force photo by Airman 1st Class Kevin Tanenbaum

Chas Tedder, Mission First Support Services non-destructive inspection technician, and Staff Sgt. Samantha Hershberg, United States Air Force Thunderbirds NDI craftsman, train on a new x-ray inspection tool in the NDI lab on Nellis Air Force Base, Nev., Sept. The new x-ray tool can locate even the smallest cracks or inconsistencies in numerous amounts of aircraft parts.
 

U.S. Air Force photo by Airman 1st Class Kevin Tanenbaum

X-rays of aircraft parts sit on a shelf in the Non-destructive Inspection lab on Nellis Air Force Base, Nev., Sept. 28. The NDI Lab at Nellis AFB is unique in the way that the technicians get to inspect many different weapons systems and aircraft
 

U.S. Air Force photo by Airman 1st Class Kevin Tanenbaum

Corey Dewese, Mission First Support Services non-destructive inspection technician, performs a test for cracks in a missile mount in the NDI Lab on Nellis Air Force Base, Nev., Sept. 28. The NDI Lab helps ensure the structural integrity of aircraft and sub-assemblies, as well as ensure the safety of the pilots and personnel on the ground.
 

U.S. Air Force photo by Airman 1st Class Kevin Tanenbaum

Charles Duke, Mission First Support Services non-destructive inspection technician, and Staff Sgt. John Mantanona, 823rd Maintenance Squadron NDI craftsman, discuss an x-ray on the screen during training in the NDI Lab on Nellis Air Force Base, Nev., Sept. 28. The NDI Lab inspects aircraft structures and sub-assemblies for defects and foreign objects by performing oil analysis, fluorescent dye penetrant, fluorescent magnetic particle, ultrasonic, eddy current and radiographic inspections.