Without 757th AMXS, WSINT isn’t

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Across the Nellis Air Force Base, Nev., flightline, maintainers assigned to the 757th Aircraft Maintenance Squadron participated alongside their pilots during the U.S. Air Force Weapons School Integration.

For pilots, their Weapons School training boiled down to their capstone: WSINT, a two-week series of complex, large-force employment missions.

Completing WSINT requires a working relationship with aircraft maintainers, whose roles in the exercise are vital. Maintainers throughout Strike, Eagle, Raptor and Thunder Aircraft Maintenance Units assisted their pilots by skillfully preparing, launching and recovering the aircraft.

Airman 1st Class Clayton Ackerman, 757th Aircraft Maintenance Squadron Strike Aircraft Maintenance Unit F-15E Strike Eagle fighter jet maintainer, launches an F-15E during the Weapons School Integration (WSINT) Dec. 4, 2018, at Nellis Air Force Base, Nev. Completing WSINT requires a working relationship with aircraft maintainers, whose roles in the exercise are vital.

“We maintain the aircraft’s 100 percent capability to make sure our pilots have a good product to take up with them and perform their duties,” said Tech. Sgt. Jason Gauna, 757th AMXS Strike AMU avionics technician.

Gauna said the 757th AMXS’s participation in WSINT is a perfect example of the proficiency they’re capable of producing every day.

Through their intermediate-level maintenance on their aircraft and support equipment components, the 757th AMXS maintainers aided the Weapons School in producing leaders capable of delivering success in a spectrum ranging from small tactical teams to strategic transformational change.
 

Airman 1st Class Bonifacio Garcia, 757th Aircraft Maintenance Squadron Strike Aircraft Maintenance Unit F-15E Strike Eagle fighter jet maintainer, prepares an F-15E for launch during the Weapons School Integration (WSINT) Dec. 4, 2018, at Nellis Air Force Base, Nev. WSINT is a two-week series of complex, large-force employment missions.