Creech airfield supports joint force exercise

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Air Force photograph by Airman 1st Class Haley Stevens

Nine C-130 Hercules taxi the airfield at Creech Air Force Base, Nev., Dec. 10, 2018, as an MQ-9 Reaper flies routine training missions. As one of the most challenging and complex missions of the year, Joint Forcible Entry exercise integrates decisive action and demonstrates crisis response as well as global mobility.

 
The usual buzzing of MQ-9 Reaper Remotely Piloted Aircraft overhead Creech Air Force Base, Nev., was augmented with the roar of approximately 20 C-130 Hercules aircraft Dec. 8-10, 2018, as the base supported a Joint Forcible Entry exercise.

Creech served as an installation support base and provided takeoff and landing areas on Air Combat Command’s second busiest airfield so the additional aircraft could be parked while the crews rested.  

“Nellis Air Force Base’s parking capability is more limited than the space at Creech,” said James Anderson, 432nd Operations Support Squadron chief of airfield operations. “Here, there is ample room for all the heavy aircraft that are a part of JFE, therefore they needed an alternate airfield to land.”

An Airman watches as a C-130 Hercules aircraft takes off from Creech Air Force Base, Nev., Dec. 10, 2018.

As one of the most challenging and complex missions of the year, JFE integrates decisive action while demonstrating crisis response and global mobility.

According to the U.S. Army, JFE exercises train the global response force, and demonstrate their readiness to deploy within hours and fight globally. The objective of this exercise is to integrate Army airborne and land operations, with joint air support, and special operations against an opposing enemy force.

A C-130 Hercules aircraft takes off from Creech Air Force Base, Nev., Dec. 10, 2018, as the base supported a Joint Forcible Entry exercise. The objective of this exercise is to integrate Army airborne and land operations, with joint air support, and special operations against an opposing enemy force.

In addition to supporting exercises like JFE, 24/7/365 combat operations and the local training mission, Creech is a divert airfield for any aircraft training in the area.

“We support a great variety of missions here at Creech,” said Chief Master Sgt. Jamie Newman, 432nd Wing/432nd Air Expeditionary Wing command chief. “Our Airmen are constantly engaged in combat operations overseas and train vigorously. In addition, we often have Soldiers and Marines training on base or in our airspace. Our support squadrons and support personnel are an integral part of ensuring we stand ready to support, deploy and win any fight, anytime, anyplace.”
 

Three C-130 Hercules taxi the airfield at Creech Air Force Base, Nev., Dec. 10, 2018.

 

An Airman sits on the cargo ramp of a KC-130 Hercules while waiting to take of at Creech Air Force Base, Nev., Dec. 10, 2018.

 

A C-130 Hercules aircraft takes off from Creech Air Force Base, Nev., Dec. 8-10, 2018, as the base supported a Joint Forcible Entry exercise.

 

C-130 Hercules aircraft taxi the airfield at Creech Air Force Base, Nev., Dec. 10, 2018, as an MQ-9 Reaper flies routine training missions.

 

Approximately 20 C-130 Hercules aircraft landed at Creech Air Force Base, Nev., Dec. 8-10, 2018, as the base supported a Joint Forcible Entry exercise.

 

A C-130 Hercules aircrew ready the aircraft for takeoff from Creech Air Force Base, Nev., Dec. 10, 2018, as the base supported a Joint Forcible Entry exercise.

 

An MQ-9 Reaper waits under a sunshade while two C-130 Hercules takes off from Creech Air Force Base, Nev., Dec. 10, 2018. The base supported a Joint Forcible Entry exercise which integrates decisive action and demonstrates crisis response as well as global mobility.